Volunteers of America Inc dba Volunteers of America of Florida Inc
405 Central Avenue, Suite 100
St. Petersburg FL 33701
Mission
Volunteers of America of Florida engages Floridians in need to create positive life changes through compassionate support services.
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Janet M Stringfellow
Board Chair Mr. David Houssian
Board Chair Affiliation Sago Networks
General Info
Organization DBA
DBA
Volunteers of America of Florida Inc
Former Names
Volunteers of America North and Central Florida
Tax Exempt Status Public Supported Charity
Incorporation Year 1992
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes May 2017
State Registration Yes May 2016
IRS Letter of Determination
View
Financial Summary
 
 
Projected Revenue $18,357,310.00
Projected Expenses $18,237,900.00
Impact Statement
Accomplishments:
1) Diversification of revenue streams-secured additional contracts with third-party insurers to be billed for behavioral health services provided;  secured contracts for behavioral services expanding services in Suncoast area and Jacksonville, and adding 2 new regions:  Lake City and Ocala; 2 new supportive housing complexes (in Tampa and in Ocala) began construction and wll be complete in 2016.
2) Grow Ministry to be infused throughout services-implemented Servant Leadership model of service delivery statewide; added Chaplain that provides pastoral care for participants and employees in individual and group sessions.
3) Promote programmatic and operational excellence-pay for outstanding performance program implemented; results-oriented staff development and training implemented; contract for new Electronic Medical Record platform and Project Manager to manage implementation of same.
Goals:
1) Meet needs of emerging populations and diversify funding sources increasing net revenue streams-expand behavioral health services and revenue sources; expand existing services and grow presence with new programs/services.
2) Promote programmatic and operational excellence to become the employer and provider of choice-provide after-hours and weekend activities for participants; design and conduct study to track participant success; expand and increase our healthcare reach,
3) Strengthen and grow external relationships and partnerships to intensify and support programs, services and fundraising efforts. 
Needs Statement
  1. Critical needs for the most vulnerable that aren't covered by other grant opportunities. $250K
  2. Funding to sustain our housing portfolio as a place to heal.$500K
  3. Funding for systems to help us track our results driven services. $260K
  4. New and creative housing development initiatives. $600K
  5. Funding for strong and high quality support services. 
Background Statement

Volunteers of America of Florida is the charity that always steps forward taking on the most difficult tasks to help the most underserved. We are more than a nonprofit organization, we are a ministry of service with over 190 paid, professional and support employees dedicated to helping those in need rebuild their lives and reach their full potential. Through our 78 human service programs, including housing, health care, vocational education and employment services, we touch the lives of more than 14,000 people from Pensacola to Key West each year. Since 1988, we have supported and empowered over 290,000 people from America's most vulnerable groups, including veterans, the frail elderly, homeless individuals and families, people with mental illness and those recovering from addictions,

Our Behavioral Health Continuum of Care and Best Practices feature: a therapeutic 'Life Plan' contract where each individual identifies the steps to attain their own person-centered goals; motivational case management; trauma free 'Seeking Safety' therapy; critical time intervention; instruction in basic daily living skills; involvement of families and significant others; and results driven accountability. We have provided (outcomes-based) recovery and resiliency, community support (supported living and drop-in), residential care, TANF and substance abuse aftercare for over twenty years and as an accredited The Joint Commission behavioral health care provider since 2000, 

 

Working in many Florida communities for over twenty years, we have established a reliable network of collaborative partners to locate and engage the vulnerable populations that we serve as well as fully meet the individual needs of each person served. We actively participate in homeless coalition continuums of care in Alachua, Brevard, Broward, Charlotte, Duval, Escambia, Hillsborough, Leon, Manatee, Marion, Miami-Dade, Monroe, Pinellas and Sarasota counties to name a few. We interact regularly with VA Community-Based Outpatient Clinics, Health Care for Homeless Veterans Coordinators, and Medical Centers in all the previously mentioned counties. At least monthly, sometimes as much as weekly outreach and service delivery maintains our connection with shelters, churches, hospitals, mental health and substance abuse treatment centers, jail and justice systems, school districts and transit agencies in each community we serve.
Areas Served
Areas Served
Area
FL
FL- Charlotte
FL- Hillsborough
FL- Manatee
FL-Pinellas
FL- Sarasota
Areas Served Comments Volunteers of America of Florida serves the entire state of Florida as well as Puerto Rico.  Specifically, we serve vulnerable individuals and families in The Giving Partner area:  All of the greater Tampa Bay area particularly Central, East and the University Area of Tampa, Plant City, Downtown and Midtown St. Petersburg and Tarpon Springs; all of the greater Manatee and Sarasota area particularly Bradenton and Palmetto; and Punta Gorda in Charlotte County.  
Service Categories
Primary Org Type Human Services
Secondary Org Type Housing, Shelter
Tertiary Org Type Employment
Statement from the Board Chair/Board President
Statement from the CEO/Executive Director

Volunteers of America of Florida serves the most vulnerable in our State; the hardest to serve.  Results oriented is in our DNA as we achieve high success rates of keeping individuals out of psychiatric and medical hospitalizations, out of jail and reaching new levels of health in a very cost effective way for our funders and supporters.  All our services are individualized and we track our performance accordingly.  The main challenge we continue to experience is not enough funding for the comprehensive and high credential services we know our participants need to maintain a great level of success.  We create long term solutions for very complex lives and situations.  Currently, we address those funding gaps with a very special workforce that is willing to donate 1% of their salary back to the organization to pay for those critical items and services that no other grant or funding opportunities are covering.  Our staff are a very special group of servant leaders that consistently go the extra mile to serve those in need in very creative ways.  Also, we receive private donations from partnerships with other organizations and corporations like the Home Depot Foundation which helps us cover the funding gaps.  We are the number one provider of transitional housing for homeless veterans; and we work hard to extend our continuum of care umbrella to permanent housing for those who served us first.  The non-profit classification is in our spirit but we treat our delivery and results as serious as a for-profit. We measure success when a participant becomes independent, is integrated and contributing to the community. 

Programs
Description We currently operate over 60 permanent and transitional housing programs that serve over 5,500 vulnerable Floridians annually. In the Foundations's service area, vulnerable households may find a safe, decent and affordable place to call home in ten program locations. Households burdened paying over 50% of their income for housing costs may find affordable permanent housing in Bradenton or Palmetto. Low-income people with severe and persistent mental illness may find affordable permanent supportive housing at 6 different locations in Bradenton. In Bradenton and Punta Gorda, our transitional supportive housing helps homeless veterans with one or more disability. Supported housing allows economically challenged adults and those with mental illness (and their families) to live independently. Our housing programs help people create positive life changes, rebuild their lives and reach their full potential.
Budget $7,500,000
Category Housing, General/Other Affordable Housing
Program Linked to Organizational Strategy Yes
Population Served Families People/Families with of People with Disabilities Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Short Term Success

 We operate over 78 programs statewide with 3 performance outcomes common to all programs:  1)  over 95% achieve housing stability, 2) 45% increased or improved skills/income/employment level; 3) 99% greater self-determination (community reintegration, satisfaction).  For the past year (10/2014-11/2015)   Agency wide overall results:  1) 89%, 2) 65% and 3) 99%. 

Long Term Success Our housing programs and services strive to help all people reach, maintain and sustain improved levels of functioning, self-sufficient independent living, and community reintegration. Behavioral health and human services encourage and promote wellness of the mind and body while training, education and employment resources focus on recovery and reintegration into the community through work. Ultimately measures of long-term success include ending cycles of dependency, homelessness, reducing public costs for incarceration, institutionalization and hospitalization.
Program Success Monitoring Our continuous quality improvement (CQI) process measures, evaluates and oversees participant, program and agency performance.  A Life 'treatment' Plan created with each participant includes goals and identifies the steps to achieve those goals.  The entire program team meets at least weekly reviewing the successes and challenges achieved by at least one-quarter of the participants – ensuring a thorough review of each adult's progress at least monthly. If challenges are preventing progress, the team explores options and works with the adult adjusting accordingly ensuring continued progress. The CQI process monitors administration, fiscal control, operations and risk management ensuring compliance, efficiency and effective program implementation and operation. The agency is dedicated to delivering premier services with superior results as associated with each participant.
Program Success Examples  For the past year (10/2014-11/2015) results of participants in all agency programs averaged:  1) 89% achieved housing stability, 2) 65% improved or increased skills, income and/or employment, and 3) 99% participated in community activities and expressed satisfaction with self.  
Description Adult mental health and substance abuse services, supported housing, aftercare, TANF including outreach, case management, symptom management, medication management, substance abuse prevention, pain awareness and management, individual and group therapy, securing emergency treatment and crisis intervention, stabilization and support, daily living skills and social rehabilitation skills. 
Budget $5,700,000
Category Human Services, General/Other Human Services, General/Other
Program Linked to Organizational Strategy Yes
Population Served Adults Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent People/Families with of People with Physical Disabilities
Short Term Success

Example performance outcomes:

1) Decreasing admissions/readmissions to detox and inpatient treatment facilities/institutions

Objective: 90 % of participants receiving services will remain in the program and will not have an admission to an in-patient substance abuse treatment program within the calendar month.
 
2) Decrease incarceration
Objective: 90 % of participants receiving services will remain in the program and will not be incarcerated within the calendar month.
 
3) Improve SASSI score
Objective: 90% of participants receiving services will have a SASSI score improvement of 20% or better between admission and discharge of services.
Long Term Success

 Participants learn to:

  • Recognize and manage mental health
  • Build self-confidence and self-determination
  • Live independently in the community without substance abuse or dependence - maintain sobriety.
  • Obtain and maintain self-sufficiency in community (not utilizing high-end, high-cost public services). 
Program Success Monitoring Program staff members meet weekly to review the progress of each client and the overall program reviewing counselor notes and data from the participant medical record particularly progress and barriers faced by according to the Life Team Plan of each individual . Management and leadership conducting ongoing oversight of the program will analyze expenditures at least monthly making adjustments to program operations as needed to ensure all funds are expended in a timely manner. Our system of program implementation and continuous quality improvement (CQI) are two more checks and balances that will ensure client satisfaction, participant and program outcome performance, compliance and expenditure of all funding. The CQI team meets quarterly monitoring and analyzing program data making needed adjustments to improve performance including the expenditure of funding. Volunteers of America of Florida has maintained The Joint Commission Behavioral Health Care Accreditation since 2000. Following The Joint Commission standards of excellence has ensured ethical behavior in care, treatment, services and business practices; care is based on identified care, treatment and services needs and desires of individual; clients are made aware of their rights which are respected; a complaint and grievance system of resolution is available to clients; the confidentiality of clients is respected and protected; the collection and use of data to continually improve care, performance and safety and reduce risk; and conflicts of interestare defined, disclosed and addressed. The continuous quality improvement (CQI) system analyzes participant and program performance following accredited Joint Commission standards in order to achieve quality results.
Program Success Examples Volunteers of America of Florida has contracted with DCF for twenty years providing adult mental health and substance abuse services (in later years from DCF managing entities: Broward Behavioral Health Coalition, Central Florida Behavioral Health Network, Lutheran Services Florida and South Florida Behavioral Health Network). Over the past five fiscal years (7/1/09-6/30/14), at least 99% of consumers in programs statewide did not spend any days in a psychiatric hospital during the fiscal year and at least 97% were involved in a meaningful activity each month. Over the past 5 years we have provided the described services to 4,295 adults, adolescents and families in the Suncoast Region, Highland County, Miami, Jacksonville, and Broward County.
Description Since 1998 we have been committed to finding new resources and creating new programs to help vulnerable veterans; those experiencing or at-risk of homelessness and often dealing with emotional, mental, physical and substance abuse issues. We have eleven homeless veterans; transitional supportive housing programs (including Bradenton, Punta Gorda and Tampa). A team of professional staff members provide a thorough and comprehensive approach to support stable housing and mental health, successful, long-term employment and economic self-sufficiency for veterans struggling to overcome barriers of homelessness and a disabling condition. Our VA partnership and support extends to drop-in service centers at two of our transitional housing programs. Some of the supportive resources available to veterans at our drop-in service centers include a computer lab, streaming video training library, job readiness skills training resources and recreational activities.
Budget $6,300,000
Category Human Services, General/Other Human Services, General/Other
Program Linked to Organizational Strategy Yes
Population Served Other Named Groups Homeless Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated
Short Term Success
Program goals:
  1. Housing stability
  2. Increased skill level and/or income
  3. Greater self-determination
Long Term Success The program is designed to prepare veterans for a successful transition to permanent housing and community reintegration. Program goals of housing stability, improved income/skill and greater self determination measure long-term success of each veteran through the achievement of a number of objectives: including those veterans that successfully exit program to permanent housing, increase income, secure and maintain employment, complete a training/learning module and regularly participate in community meetings, events or other group activities.
Program Success Monitoring  Program staff members meet weekly to review the progress of each client and the overall program reviewing counselor notes and data from the participant medical record particularly progress and barriers faced by according to the Life Team Plan of each individual . Management and leadership conducting ongoing oversight of the program will analyze expenditures at least monthly making adjustments to program operations as needed to ensure all funds are expended in a timely manner. Our system of program implementation and continuous quality improvement (CQI) are two more checks and balances that will ensure client satisfaction, participant and program outcome performance, compliance and expenditure of all funding. The CQI team meets quarterly monitoring and analyzing program data making needed adjustments to improve performance including the expenditure of funding. Volunteers of America of Florida has maintained The Joint Commission Behavioral Health Care Accreditation since 2000. Following The Joint Commission standards of excellence has ensured ethical behavior in care, treatment, services and business practices; care is based on identified care, treatment and services needs and desires of individual; clients are made aware of their rights which are respected; a complaint and grievance system of resolution is available to clients; the confidentiality of clients is respected and protected; the collection and use of data to continually improve care, performance and safety and reduce risk; and conflicts of interestare defined, disclosed and addressed. The continuous quality improvement (CQI) system analyzes participant and program performance following accredited Joint Commission standards in order to achieve quality results.
Program Success Examples

We have helped over 5,100 vulnerable veterans in Florida in the past 16 years:  994 veterans successfully transitioning from homelessness to independent living, 3,428 veterans reintegrated into civilian workforce and 750 veteran families achieve housing stability.

Comments
Program Comments by Organization

   We have served vulnerable individuals and families in Charlotte, Hillsborough, Manatee, Pinellas and Sarasota Counties for over twenty years with supported housing for people and families experiencing or at-risk of homelessness, seniors and homeless veterans with mental illness and substance abuse disorders. The agency strives to inspire those we serve to learn, do and become more - focusing on quality performance and high human satisfaction and making sure highest priority needs are met first. We strive to help each person that we serve encouraging and promoting a spiritual sense of well-being, opportunities for training and employment, and a place to call home. An individualized plan of action is developed for each person identifying the programs, services, resources and tools that will best focus support for that individual’s wellness, self-sufficiency and independence.

Our affordable, permanent, multifamily housing programs in Manatee, Hillsborough and Pinellas Counties offer households that are homeless, dealing with housing instability or with other special needs our unique and comprehensive behavioral health and human supportive services. Families are helped to find a safe, clean place to call home and are offered the tools and resources to achieve personal, financial and housing stability.

Our culture of care as evidenced and accredited by The Joint Commission standards of excellence for Behavioral Health Care include:  commitment to well-being of others without judgment and respecting diversity; quality practices and systems; accountability; honest, ethical, sincere and trustworthy integrity; meeting highest priority needs focusing on high performance with highest satisfaction; and recognizing emerging needs and embracing change.

CEO/Executive Director
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Janet M Stringfellow
CEO Term Start Nov 1998
CEO/Executive Director Email jstringfellow@voa-fla.org
Experience

Fifteen years of professional experience in management, program development, research and community organization; certified and licensed rehabilitation counselor. 

Volunteers of America of Florida professional history: 11/1998 -present

2013-present President/CEO

2010-2013 Chief of Administration, Marketing and Fund Raising

2006-2013 Director of Education and Support

1998-2003 and 2005-2006 Program Manager

Education: 

University of Puerto Rico, Masters Rehabilitation Counseling, 1997

University of Puerto Rico, BA Public Communication, 1992

Licensed Rehabilitation Counselor

Former CEOs/Executive Directors
NameTerm
Ms. Kathryn E Spearman-Kimball June 1988 - June 2013
Senior Staff
NameTitle
Mr. Travis Brown Director of Housing and Development
Ms. Patricia Norstedt Executive Vice President-Quality and Ministry
Ms. Mercedes Pargas Executive Vice President of Finance
Mr. Raymond N Tuller IIIChief Operating Officer and Chief Financial Officer
Mr. Jeffrey Watts Director of Performance Management
Staff & Volunteer Statistics
Full Time Staff 192
Part Time Staff 37
Staff Retention Rate % 80
Professional Development Yes
Contractors 3
Volunteers 55
Management Reports to Board Yes
CEO/Executive Director Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non-Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Collaborations
  • Dept of Housing and Urban Development Section 811, Section 202 and Neighborhood Stabilization Program projects (since 1989)
  • Dept of Veterans Affairs Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem, Per Diem Only, Service Centers and Supportive Services for Veteran Families Programs (since 2000)

  • Florida Housing Finance Corporation special needs, affordable housing developer (since 1996)

  • US Dept of Labor Veterans Employment and Training Services Homeless Veterans Reintegration Programs (since 2003).
  • HUD certified a property manager

  • Florida Department of Children and Families Substance Abuse and Adult Mental Health service provider and licensed provider of Adult Substance Abuse Aftercare (since 1994)

  • Florida Department of Education Commission for Independent Education licensing to operate four postsecondary adult learning centers (since 2007)

  • Florida Department of Education Division of Vocational Rehabilitation provider of employment and supported-employment services (since 2008)

  • Florida Certification Board Approved Education Provider (since 2012)

  • Florida city and county municipalities partnerships and collaborations (since 1992)

  • Local community and veteran service providers, coalitions, and organizations partnerships and collaborations (since 1992)

Affiliations
AffiliationYear
CLIA-Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments2015
External Assessments and Accreditations
Assessment/AccreditationYear
Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) - Behavioral Health Care Accreditation
Risk Management Provisions
Government Licenses
Organization Licensed by the Government Yes
Plans
Fundraising Plan No
Communication Plan Yes
Strategic Plan Yes
Strategic Plan Years 5
Strategic Plan Adopted June 2015
Management Succession Plan Yes
Continuity of Operations Plan Yes
Policies
Nondiscrimination Policy Under Development
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy No
Policies and Procedures Yes
Comments
Management Comments by Organization

Financial stability has been a major objective since the economic downturn of 2008 and its adverse impact on the financial position of the organization.  Five years of concentrated effort on the part of the management team has positioned the organization in better financial health stabilizing cash flow, decreasing liabilities and accounts payable time frames.  Management secured additional resources as well including multiple new contracts for behavioral health services and increased unrestricted fund raising revenue.  

Management is working to sustain programs challenged by limited revenue and finding creative and cost effective opportunities to effect much needed capital improvements.   


 

Multi-Media Comments by Organization

The Development and Outreach Team was created to help tell the Volunteers of America of Florida story, to spread the word about all of the great work our Team does every single day.

The Development and Outreach Team helps local programs and agency-wide efforts to cultivate friends and partners, raise more money and gain more visibility.  The specific GOALS of the Development & Outreach Team directly align with our Organization’s Strategic Goals. Our Goals are to diversify revenue streams and increase unrestricted funds as well as raise brand awareness for our organization.
If you have any question, please contact the Development & Outreach team, Development@voa-fla.org.
Board Chair
Board Chair Mr. David Houssian
Company Affiliation Sago Networks
Board Term June 2011 to June 2020
Board Chair Email dave@houssian.com
Board Members
Board Members
NameAffiliation
Ms. Kristin Andersen BayBottom News
Mr. Robert Atkins Retired
Mr. Alex Bueno Humana MarketPoint
Mrs. Helen Gutierrez Hillsborough Community College
Dr. Maurice Harvey St. Leo University
Mr David Houssian Sago Networks
Dr. Daniel Rosenberg Barry University
Mr. Edwin A. Shepherdson CFO Sources
Mr. Stephen Tabano Stephen Tabano, Attorney At Law
Mrs. Allison Tutwiler Allimar Marketing & Public Relations
Mr. Wilbert Vaughn Retired- Army
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes
Board Ethnicity
African American/Black 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 7
Hispanic/Latino 2
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Gender
Male 8
Female 3
Unspecified 0
Governance
Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 3
Board Orientation Yes
Number of Full Board Meetings Annually 4
Board Meeting Attendance % 71
Board Self-Evaluation Yes
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Board Conflict of Interest Policy Yes
% of Board Making Monetary Contributions 90
% of Board Making In-Kind Contributions 100
Standing Committees
Board Governance
By-laws
Community Outreach / Community Relations
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Executive
Finance
Nominating
Marketing
Comments
Governance Comments by Organization Volunteers of America of Florida's Board of Directors are becoming more involved with Outreach and Development.  In previous years Board Members did not participate in fundraising and marketing events.  Now they are providing us with great opportunities to make new partnerships and gain new connections in our communities. We did recently have a number of our veteran Board members complete their final term with Volunteers of America of Florida., so we are currently reviewing our upcoming talent pool for new board members.
 
Fiscal Year Projections
Fiscal Year Begins 2015
Fiscal Year Ends 2016
Projected Revenue $18,357,310.00
Projected Expenses $18,237,900.00
Organization has Endowment No
Capital Campaign
In a Capital Campaign No
Campaign Purpose
Campaign Goal
Campaign Dates 0 to 0
Amount Raised To Date 0 as of 0
IRS Form 990s
Audit/Financial Documents
Historical Financial Review
Revenue SourcesHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201420132012
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$0$0$0
Government Contributions$8,589,105$8,569,341$9,572,444
Federal$0$0$0
State$0$0$0
Local$0$0$0
Unspecified$8,589,105$8,569,341$9,572,444
Individual Contributions$1,308,176$1,143,897$2,347,405
$0$0$0
$4,737,485$6,059,949$5,049,289
Investment Income, Net of Losses$0$0$651
Membership Dues$0$0$0
Special Events$0$0$125,656
Revenue In-Kind$2,090,813$520,910$1,619,913
Other$0$0$0
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201420132012
Program Expense$11,592,792$10,964,083$10,249,913
Administration Expense$1,983,538$2,908,244$2,150,270
Fundraising Expense$117,077$99,766$121,437
Payments to Affiliates$253,599$0$0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.071.131.37
Program Expense/Total Expenses85%78%82%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue1%1%1%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201420132012
Total Assets$37,463,649$35,193,795$33,716,492
Current Assets$7,976,952$6,720,772$8,081,190
Long-Term Liabilities$21,285,765$20,658,363$20,295,355
Current Liabilities$1,230,917$1,839,016$1,042,707
Total Net Assets$14,946,967$12,696,416$12,378,430
Top Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201420132012
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountGovernment Grants - Unspecified $8,589,105Government Grants - Unspecified $8,569,341Government Grants - Unspecified $9,572,444
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountOther Income $2,613,980Other Income $4,271,766Other Income $3,316,918
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountProgram Service Revenue $1,895,540Program Service Revenue $1,243,555Contributions, gifts, grants $2,347,405
CEO/Executive Director Compensation $150,001 - $175,000
Tax Credits No
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201420132012
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities6.483.657.75
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201420132012
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets57%59%60%
Financials Comments
Financial Comments by Organization
Our greatest ongoing financial challenge is securing unrestricted funding to meet organizational and operational costs not supported by grants, contracts or other revenue sources.  The management team and other designated staff members actively research, evaluate feasibility and pursue opportunities to meet this need.  
 
We are also challenged to meet the capital needs that will sustain and extend the life of our extensive housing portfolio.  We own and operate more than 60 housing programs providing people and families experiencing or at risk of homelessness (below poverty level, extremely low-, very low-, low- and moderate-income)  throughout Florida over 2,000 units of safe and decent housing, Housing subsidies and rent revenue from  income-challenged residents do not generate sufficient revenue reserves to meet capital needs. Our efforts to locate resources to maintain and sustain our housing portfolio is ongoing.
 
The management team is actively working to secure more revenue to fully support the behavioral health services that are a part of each program:
  • Diversify our behavioral health insurance profile
  • Improve our electronic record keeping and implement a system that will facilitate our ability to bill Medicaid, Medicare and other 3rd party insurers for eligible services delivered
 
Financial Comments by Foundation Financial information taken from the Federal 990s and audited financial statements.  Contributions include foundation and corporate support.
Nonprofit Volunteers of America Inc dba Volunteers of America of Florida Inc
Address 405 Central Avenue, Suite 100
St. Petersburg, FL
Phone 727 369-8500

THE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION OF SARASOTA COUNTY, INC. IS A REGISTERED 501(C)(3) NON-PROFIT CORPORATION. A COPY OF THE OFFICIAL REGISTRATION AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE DIVISION OF CONSUMER SERVICES BY CALLING TOLL-FREE WITHIN THE STATE (1-800-HELP-FLA) OR FROM THE WEBSITE: WWW.FRESHFROMFLORIDA.COM. REGISTRATION DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT, APPROVAL, OR RECOMMENDATION BY THE STATE. ONE HUNDRED PERCENT (100%) OF EACH CONTRIBUTION IS RECEIVED BY THE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION OF SARASOTA COUNTY. REGISTRATION #SC-02471.