Redlands Christian Migrant Association, Inc.
402 W Main St
Immokalee FL 34142-3933
Mission
RCMA opens doors to opportunities through quality child care and education from crib to high school and beyond.
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Barbara Mainster
Board Chair Ms. Medora Krome
Board Chair Affiliation President, Krome Groves
General Info
Organization DBA
DBA
Redlands Christian Migrant Association
RCMA
Supported Organization RCMA Immigration Assistance Program, Inc.
Tax Exempt Status Public Supported Charity
Incorporation Year 1965
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes Feb 2017
State Registration 0
IRS Letter of Determination
View
Financial Summary
 
 
Projected Revenue $64,936,866.00
Projected Expenses $64,936,866.00
Impact Statement

Accomplishments in the 2015-16 fiscal year

  • Ninety percent of the children in RCMA made progress during the 2015-16 school year, increasing their language, literacy and communication skills to a developmentally appropriate level based on daily assessments in the classrooms.

  • RCMA completed construction of a $3.6 million child-care center, with a capacity of 176 children, in the heart of Florida’s strawberry region. Costs were covered by federal grants and loans.

  • Led by a newly hired immigration attorney, the RCMA Immigration Assistance Program began counseling immigrant parents of RCMA children about what they should do, and should not do, in response to changes in federal immigration policies.

  • One of Tampa’s leading private schools launched an effort to help ambitious low-income students enter college through a 6-year program anchored in summer studies. Of the 40 sixth graders admitted into the first class, 17 were from Leadership Academy, an RCMA charter school.


RCMA’s goals for the current year

  • Continually upgrade the effectiveness of RCMA services to children and their families.

  • Manage a smooth transition to the leadership of a new executive director.

  • Finish construction of an RCMA child-care center to serve up to 60 children in Lake Placid’s Highway Park neighborhood.

Needs Statement

How you can help…

-- Our Arcadia child-care center would like to replace a portable climber with a permanent “toddler two” in-the-ground multi-purpose climber. $6,000.

-- The screened porch at our Nocatee center is where babies up to age 1 enjoy outdoor play. But the aging porch needs to be replaced. $12,000.
 
-- The Arcadia center could use more “built to last” tricycles. $200 each.
 
-- Our Smith-Brown center in Arcadia needs wooden building blocks, which help preschool children learn their earliest math lessons. Blocks range from $12 to $85 per set.
 
-- Both the Smith-Brown and Nocatee centers need outdoor water tables, sink-like structures that help children develop their sensory skills by playing with water and water toys. $1,600 per location.
-- Help us fulfill our matching-funds requirement for RCMA’s contract with the state. This category of giving yields the best return on your investment. Every dollar raised from the community qualifies RCMA for $16 in operations funding from Florida’s School Readiness program.
Background Statement

RCMA was born in 1965, in response to a profound humanitarian need. Impoverished farmworkers in South Florida had no alternative but to take their young children with them when they worked. A toddler had drowned in an irrigation pit. Others had died under farm machinery. Most spent long days exposed to broiling sun, pesticides, insects and snakes.

So a village of Mennonites near Homestead’s Redlands labor camp opened two child care centers.

Most of the farmworkers stayed away. The bewildered Mennonites enlisted Wendell Rollason, a crusader for immigrant rights in the Miami area. Rollason reached out to the farmworkers. Still, the response was anemic.

Then an ordinary day in a childcare center became the most pivotal day in RCMA history, because two things were momentarily different.

1.     An unusually large number of mothers had signed up to volunteer.

2.     An unusually large number of other mothers had left their children in the center.

Rollason made the connection: The farmworkers would entrust their babies only to caregivers from their own culture. He decided to hire childcare staff from among the farmworkers.

Rollason’s illuminating moment would reshape the futures of countless babies, a thousand or so mothers and RCMA itself. Soon, the little ones filled RCMA childcare centers to capacity. The mothers found themselves no longer forgotten in the fields, but launching new childcare careers, in mainstream society, with lifelong educational opportunities.

Farmworkers’ first point of contact with RCMA was someone who has walked in their shoes.

Henceforth, RCMA’s childcare centers and regional offices would be led by a coordinator from the culture of the community served, always backed up by a childcare expert hired for her professional background, regardless of culture. To farmworkers, RCMA became a beacon of compassion.

RCMA’s initial concern – the health of young children – was quickly allayed through good nutrition and health screenings. Early-childhood education became, and remained, RCMA’s top priority.

From the two child care centers in Homestead, RCMA has grown today to 68 centers in 21 Florida counties. Government grants comprise nearly 90 percent of RCMA’s $65 million annual budget.

Since 2000, RCMA has opened two elementary-level charter schools and a third for middle-schoolers.

Yet all of RCMA retains Wendell Rollason’s original vision: to engage low-income families with extraordinary cultural sensitivity, and prepare their children to thrive.

 

Areas Served
Areas Served
Area
In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
FL- DeSoto
FL- Hardee
FL- Lee
FL- Hillsborough
FL- Manatee
FL
Areas Served Comments
RCMA operates child-care centers for low-income families, particularly farm workers, in rural Florida. It has 68 child-care centers, three charter schools and seven after-school programs, operating in more than 50 different locations. These include ... Ruskin, Wimauma, Arcadia, Avon Park, Plant City, Immokalee, Homestead and many others.
Service Categories
Primary Org Type Education
Secondary Org Type Education
Tertiary Org Type Youth Development
Statement from the Board Chair/Board President
Statement from the CEO/Executive Director

Barbara Mainster, Executive Director

Some days, my thoughts are drawn to Washington or Tallahassee, and I trade emails with the nation’s leaders in early-childhood education.

But most days, my attention is focused far closer to the fruit and vegetable fields of Florida, where RCMA was born. That’s where our collective heart is, despite 50 years of growth.

The people we serve, and the people we hire to serve them, come from Florida’s fields and rural communities. We welcome pregnant moms, and nurture their babies as young as six weeks. We take toddlers with disabilities, whose mothers may have been exposed to pesticides or received inadequate prenatal care. We take children who, as young as 3, show developmental delays because their home lives lack stimulation.

All children deserve loving care, and we’ll provide it. Their parents deserve help, and we’ll provide that too.

Many of our children were born to immigrants, and their young lives share a paradox.They plunge into America’s language and culture. Their parents approve, knowing that assimilation is a step toward success. Yet far too often, the Americanization of the children creates alienation from the parents. The children forget Spanish, their parents’ only language.

So we speak English and Spanish in our preschools. We labor to preserve bicultural bonds in families.

Meanwhile, many of our non-immigrant families struggle in the vicious cycle of rural poverty. Our programs offer a chance to break free. Teen moms can continue their educations, while learning how to be better parents.

We teach all parents to be aggressive advocates for their children’s educations. “You are their first teachers,” we tell them.

Along the way, we tap into family strengths, helping them to set a goal and achieve it. RCMA family support workers deal with difficulties as diverse as finances, addictions, immigration, health and family violence.

This takes staying power, but that’s one of RCMA’s strengths. Since our earliest years, we have hired many of the parents we served and developed them into caregivers, teachers and program leaders. In the process of rescuing their children from poverty, we have rescued thousands of mothers too. Nationwide, the child care business is notorious for high staff turnover. But not at RCMA. Our staff loyalty is unmatched.

They know what it is to be trapped in poverty and they want desperately to help others escape it.

Many have been inspired by RCMA and have joined us as volunteers and donors. We invite you to become part of our RCMA Family too.
Programs
Description

The largest subset of RCMA’s operations, this federally funded program provides child care and excellent early-childhood education to children of families that migrate for work. Schedules are customized to migrations, and centers typically operate November through May. Center hours are long, from early morning until dusk.

Budget $18,146,597
Category Education, General/Other Early Childhood Education
Program Linked to Organizational Strategy Yes
Population Served Infants to Preschool (under age 5) Migrant Workers Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Short Term Success

Children who enter kindergarten ready and eager to thrive; parents who are prepared to push aggressively for their children’s success.

Long Term Success

Children who progress successfully through school after leaving RCMA – with strong parental support – then successfully pursue careers.

Program Success Monitoring

Assessments, at least monthly, of each child in up to 10 aspects of learning. The assessments are based on the Learning Accomplishment Profile-3, developed at the University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill.

Program Success Examples

At five, a child can fasten a seat belt, draw a simple house, complete a bead pattern, choose his own friends, kick a ball and tell a story from a picture book.

Description

RCMA receives some $12 million annually in a contract with the state to provide quality child care to Florida’s rural poor.

Budget $11,988,097
Category Education, General/Other Early Childhood Education
Program Linked to Organizational Strategy Yes
Population Served Infants to Preschool (under age 5) Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Hispanic, Latino Heritage
Short Term Success

Children who enter kindergarten ready and eager to thrive; parents who are prepared to push aggressively for their children’s success.

Long Term Success Children who – with strong parental support – progress successfully through school after leaving RCMA, then successfully pursue careers.
Program Success Monitoring

Assessments, at least monthly, of each child in up to 10 aspects of learning. The assessments are based on the Learning Accomplishment Profile-3, developed at the University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill.

Program Success Examples

At five, a child can fasten a seat belt, draw a simple house, complete a bead pattern, choose his own friends, kick a ball and tell a story from a picture book.

Description

This 50-year-old federally funded program is designed to help at-risk preschoolers overcome their disadvantages and enter kindergarten ready to succeed.

Budget $7,786,686
Category Education, General/Other Early Childhood Education
Program Linked to Organizational Strategy Yes
Population Served Infants to Preschool (under age 5) Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Hispanic, Latino Heritage
Short Term Success

Children who enter kindergarten ready and eager to thrive; parents who are prepared to push aggressively for their children’s success.

Long Term Success

Children who – with strong parental support – progress successfully through school after leaving RCMA, then successfully pursue careers.

Program Success Monitoring

Assessments, at least monthly, of each child in up to 10 aspects of learning. The assessments are based on the Learning Accomplishment Profile-3, developed at the University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill.

Program Success Examples

At five, a child can fasten a seat belt, draw a simple house, complete a bead pattern, choose his own friends, kick a ball and tell a story from a picture book.

Description

A subset of the broader Head Start program aimed at younger children: infants, toddlers and pregnant teens.

 
Budget $6,821,747
Category Education, General/Other Early Childhood Education
Program Linked to Organizational Strategy Yes
Population Served Infants to Preschool (under age 5) Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Families
Short Term Success

Children have developed learning skills appropriate to their ages; parents are learning to be assertive and engaged in their children’s progress, as the child’s “first teacher.”

Long Term Success

Children who – with strong parental support – progress successfully through school after leaving RCMA, then successfully pursue careers.

Program Success Monitoring

Assessments of each baby in five domains of learning: gross motor, fine motor, cognitive, language, self  help and social-emotional. The assessments are based on the Learning Accomplishment Profile-3, developed at the University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill.

Program Success Examples

The babies are developing age-appropriately in each domain.

Description

RCMA operates three charter schools, all created to deliver excellent education in a bicultural setting to the children of low-income families. Immokalee Community School, with grades K-6, is next to RCMA’s headquarters in Immokalee, Fla. RCMA Wimauma Academy, with grades K-5, operates in a farming community south of Tampa. Both schools opened in 2000. In August 2012, RCMA opened Leadership Academy, a new middle school next to Wimauma Academy. Together, the schools serve 570 students and their families.

Budget $6,334,294
Category Education, General/Other Elementary & Secondary Education
Program Linked to Organizational Strategy Yes
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years) Hispanic, Latino Heritage Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Short Term Success

Preparation to become successful learners at higher levels, with supportive parents. Maturation into well-rounded citizens.

Long Term Success

With parental support, matriculation through high school and college. Successful careers and community leadership.

Program Success Monitoring

Parents, teachers and multiple standardized tests.

Program Success Examples

Several of RCMA’s earliest charter-school students are attending college now.

CEO/Executive Director
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Barbara Mainster
CEO Term Start Oct 1972
CEO/Executive Director Email barbara@rcma.org
Experience
Barbara Mainster joined RCMA in 1972 and became Executive Director in 1987.
More than anyone else, Barbara has pushed RCMA to embrace high standards of professionalism and compassion, and to expand where RCMA services were needed.
Barbara has bestowed lasting benefits on countless thousands of Florida’s rural poor. She also has personally redefined the term “child care” to embrace every need a child might have, and has built a vast professional culture devoted to that.

Barbara has expanded RCMA to operate some 75 child care centers, after-school programs and charter schools in 21 Florida counties. Her motive: pure humanitarianism.

Under Barbara’s leadership, Immokalee-based RCMA:

n Provides cutting-edge early childhood education to children who need it the most, when it counts the most.

n Teaches disenfranchised, rural poor parents how to advocate for their children and launch them out of poverty.

n Empowers thousands of Florida women, as assertive mothers and as employees of RCMA.

n Has become a unique national model for bicultural collaboration for children’s sake.

Former CEOs/Executive Directors
NameTerm
Senior Staff
NameTitle
Mr. Gilbert Flores Fiscal Director
Ms. Ivette Galarza Director of Operations
Ms. Isabel Garcia Associate Executive Director
Ms. Gyla Wise Senior Advisor
Staff & Volunteer Statistics
Full Time Staff 1379
Part Time Staff 272
Staff Retention Rate % 86
Professional Development Yes
Contractors 2
Volunteers 3900
Management Reports to Board Yes
CEO/Executive Director Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non-Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Collaborations
Local area agencies to provide family support for the migrant workers.
Affiliations
AffiliationYear
National Council of La Raza (NCLR) - Affiliate
External Assessments and Accreditations
Assessment/AccreditationYear
Awards & Recognition
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Florida Impact AwardLeadership Florida2014
Family Strengthening AwardNational Council of La Raza2016
Risk Management Provisions
Government Licenses
Organization Licensed by the Government Yes
Plans
Fundraising Plan No
Communication Plan No
Strategic Plan No
Strategic Plan Years 4
Strategic Plan Adopted Oct 2011
Management Succession Plan No
Continuity of Operations Plan No
Policies
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy No
Policies and Procedures Yes
Board Chair
Board Chair Ms. Medora Krome
Company Affiliation President, Krome Groves
Board Term Sept 2016 to Sept 2022
Board Chair Email mkavoc9@gmail.com
Board Members
Board Members
NameAffiliation
Mrs Linda Miles Adams Marketing, Education
Mr. Chuck Allison Spring Valley Farms
Mr. Jesus Avila Sanchez Parent representative
Mr. Michael T. Bayer Curran, Bayer & Associates LLC
Ms. Patricia Diaz Parent representative
Ms Katherine English Attorney
Mr. William (Bill) Ferrari Retired Executive (Agriculture)
Mr. Jhonny Filomeno Parent representative
Ms. Alma Gasca Parent representative
Ms. Sandra Hightower Retired educator
Mr. Al J. Hinson Retired educator
Ms. Celia Jimenez Parent representative
Ms Medora Krome Grower
Ms. Bernarda Lara Parent representative
Ms. Margaret Lopez Parent representative
Mr. Nelson Luis Retired Educator
Ms. Ilda Martinez Student
Ms. Reva McCoy Parent representative
Ms. Araceli Murrillo Immokalee Community School Parent Representative
Mr. Joaquin Perez HR Executive
Mr. Steve Price Banker
Mr. Richard Pringle P.A.Attorney
Dr. Wilma Robles de Melendez Nova Southeastern University
Mr. Larry Salustro retired attorney
Mr. Filiberto Sanchez Wimauma Academy
Ms. Margarita Sanchez Parent representative
Mr. Michael Stuart Florida Fruit & Vegetable Association
Ms. Tangia Taylor Parent representative
Mr. Fred N. Thomas JrRetired Public Administrator
Ms. Claudia Vasquez Leadership Academy
Mr. Jaime Weisinger Lipman Produce
Mr. Gary Wishnatzki Wish Farms
Constituency Includes Client Representation No
Board Ethnicity
African American/Black 4
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 13
Hispanic/Latino 15
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Gender
Male 16
Female 16
Unspecified 0
Governance
Board Term Lengths 6
Board Term Limits 4
Board Orientation Yes
Number of Full Board Meetings Annually 4
Board Meeting Attendance % 68
Board Self-Evaluation Yes
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Board Conflict of Interest Policy No
% of Board Making Monetary Contributions 72
% of Board Making In-Kind Contributions 100
Standing Committees
Finance
Nominating
Program / Program Planning
Education
Fiscal Year Projections
Fiscal Year Begins 2016
Fiscal Year Ends 2017
Projected Revenue $64,936,866.00
Projected Expenses $64,936,866.00
Organization has Endowment Yes
Endowment Value $13,000.00
Endowment Spending Policy N/A
Capital Campaign
In a Capital Campaign No
Campaign Purpose
Campaign Goal
Campaign Dates 0 to 0
Amount Raised To Date 0 as of 0
Anticipate Campaign within 5 years? Yes
Historical Financial Review
Revenue SourcesHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201620152014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$0$0$0
Government Contributions$62,438,277$58,409,223$55,374,663
Federal$1,079,683$983,960$0
State$55,904,647$51,948,671$0
Local$1,387,336$1,717,076$0
Unspecified$4,066,611$3,759,516$55,374,663
Individual Contributions$1,259,117$1,552,213$1,393,739
$66,848$0$0
$944,921$1,070,440$949,299
Investment Income, Net of Losses$13,406$12,167$5,980
Membership Dues$0$0$0
Special Events$398,106$326,024$251,849
Revenue In-Kind$3,632,227$3,458,103$3,312,454
Other$0$27,022$2,390
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201620152014
Program Expense$61,341,451$55,233,909$52,518,115
Administration Expense$6,589,825$6,121,469$6,299,624
Fundraising Expense$234,250$175,202$151,355
Payments to Affiliates$0$0$0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.010.990.98
Program Expense/Total Expenses90%90%89%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue0%0%0%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201620152014
Total Assets$31,920,638$29,078,373$29,167,418
Current Assets$8,258,936$8,211,157$9,217,650
Long-Term Liabilities$4,303,393$2,605,000$2,945,000
Current Liabilities$5,935,779$5,379,283$4,808,328
Total Net Assets$21,681,466$21,094,090$21,414,090
Top Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201620152014
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountGovernment Grants - State $55,904,647Government Grants - State $51,948,671Government Grants - Unspecified $55,374,663
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountCharter Schools Revenues $4,066,611Charter School Revenues $3,759,516Contributions, gifts, grants $1,393,739
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountDonated Space, Materials and Services $3,632,227Government Grants - Local $1,717,076Child Care Fees $926,474
CEO/Executive Director Compensation $100,001 - $125,000
Tax Credits No
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities1.391.531.92
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets13%9%10%
Financials Comments
Financial Comments by Foundation Financial information taken from IRS Form 990.  Individual contributions include foundation and corporate support.  The Federal tax returns and audited financial statements reconcile.  Financial information for 2016 taken from the audited financial statements as the Federal tax return was not available at time of review. Income per the audited financial statements includes the value of donated space, materials and services.
Nonprofit Redlands Christian Migrant Association, Inc.
Address 402 W Main St
Immokalee, FL 3933
Phone 239 658-3560 224

THE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION OF SARASOTA COUNTY, INC. IS A REGISTERED 501(C)(3) NON-PROFIT CORPORATION. A COPY OF THE OFFICIAL REGISTRATION AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE DIVISION OF CONSUMER SERVICES BY CALLING TOLL-FREE WITHIN THE STATE (1-800-HELP-FLA) OR FROM THE WEBSITE: WWW.FRESHFROMFLORIDA.COM. REGISTRATION DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT, APPROVAL, OR RECOMMENDATION BY THE STATE. ONE HUNDRED PERCENT (100%) OF EACH CONTRIBUTION IS RECEIVED BY THE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION OF SARASOTA COUNTY. REGISTRATION #SC-02471.