Harry Chapin Food Bank of Southwest Florida, Inc.
3760 Fowler Street
Fort Myers FL 33901
Mission
The Harry Chapin Food Bank of Southwest Florida's (HCFB) mission is leading our community in the fight to end hunger.
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Richard LeBer
Board Chair Anne Rose
Board Chair Affiliation Lee Health
General Info
Former Names
Lee County Food Cooperative
Tax Exempt Status Public Supported Charity
Incorporation Year 1983
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes Apr 2018
State Registration Yes Apr 2018
Financial Summary
Note: Revenue includes the value of in-kind contributions/donations
 
IRS Letter of Determination
Name
IRS Determination letterView
Other Documents
Annual Report View
Annual Report View
2015 Impact ReportView
Impact Statement

As the leading hunger-relief organization in Southwest Florida, the Harry Chapin Food Bank distributes food to more than 150 nonprofit partner agencies in Charlotte, Collier, Glades, Hendry, and Lee counties. These partner agencies serve approximately 28,000 people a week.


In fiscal year 2017, the Food Bank distributed 22.3 million pounds of food and other grocery items, including 6.6 million pounds of fresh produce, throughout Southwest Florida. Valued at $37.3 million, this food equals about 18.6 million meals for people in need.


 Volunteers are vital to the success of our programs. In fiscal year 2017, 6,100 volunteers collectively provide nearly 40,400 hours, which equate to more than $975,000 of in-kind service. (Independent Sector values volunteer hours at $24.14 per hour nationally.)


The Harry Chapin Food Bank intends to end hunger in Southwest Florida. This will require us to grow substantially. Today, it would take 37.5 million pounds of food—or 31.3 million meals—to adequately feed everyone in our area who is hungry. That is about 74 percent larger than our current distribution, and the amount continues to grow as our population grows.

 

To meet this audacious challenge, we continue to build on strategic initiatives that enable us to:

 

              FEED people when they most need food;

              LEAD our community in the fight to end hunger;

              STRENGTHEN our infrastructure and partner agencies even more so that we have the  means and capacity  to  fulfill our mission and vision.


Needs Statement
  1. Mobile Food Pantry Program - $585,000
  2. Care & Share Senior Feeding Initiative - $1.1 million
  3. Fresh Produce Program - $1.6 million
  4. Retail Food Pick-Up Program - $730,000
  5. Partner Agency Programs - $2.6 million

 

Background Statement

What began in 1983 as a grassroots organization committed to feeding people, the Harry Chapin Food Bank (HCFB) has grown into a respected nonprofit that leads the largest anti-hunger network in Southwest Florida. We rescue food that would otherwise go to waste and provide it to a network of more than 150 partner agencies that feed people in need in Charlotte, Collier, Glades, Hendry, and Lee counties.

In 1995, bank was named in honor of the late folk singer and anti-hunger advocate Harry Chapin, becoming the Harry Chapin Food Bank of Southwest Florida. In 1997, the Harry Chapin Food Bank earned "certified affiliate" status from the Second Harvest National Food Bank Network, which is now known as Feeding America, the nation's largest nonprofit hunger-relief organization.


Areas Served
Areas Served
Area
FL- Charlotte
FL- Lee
Areas Served Comments
Harry Chapin Food Bank of Southwest Florida serves Charlotte, Collier, Glades, Hendry, and Lee counties.
Service Categories
Primary Org Type Food, Agriculture & Nutrition
Secondary Org Type Human Services
Tertiary Org Type
Statement from the Board Chair/Board President
Statement from the CEO/Executive Director

The Harry Chapin Food Bank continues to make significant progress in the fight to end hunger. Because we rescue food that would otherwise go to waste, we have unique leverage, and are able to turn every dollar donated into $8 worth of food in the hands of agencies who feed the hungry. Our work is not without its challenges. We are working diligently to ensure that there is enough food available to feed everyone in our area who needs it. It is always a challenge to find food. We are always working to expand our food sources, whether from wholesalers, manufacturers, distributors, retail stores, growers, or local food sourcing and food drives.

Even so, our primary challenge is finding practical ways to distribute the food and the other services where they are needed. Logistics matter – people who are hungry need immediate help in a convenient and appropriate way. To this end, we are working to expand programs to meet the specific needs of the various groups we serve and to expand distribution through mobile pantries, school-based pantries and other channels.

We are also working with our agencies throughout Southwest Florida to expand their capabilities and capacity, so that clients receive the assistance and support they need to raise themselves out of poverty and hunger, and so that the food we source and distribute makes it quickly, efficiently, and safely into the hands of those who need it. All of our work requires funding, of course. We work every day to help people in our community understand what we do, and how our work helps hungry Southwest Floridians.

Programs
Description

The Harry Chapin Food Bank distributes food directly to children and low-income families living, working, and going to school in underserved communities through the mobile pantry program. Each day, our mobile pantry truck rolls into a community park, church or school parking lot, or other site. The truck doors open, and our driver and volunteers arrange an array of fresh produce, canned food, bread, and grains on tables for a line of waiting clients. We can serve up to 250 families per distribution.



Budget $585,000
Category Human Services, General/Other
Program Linked to Organizational Strategy Yes
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Short Term Success
  • Provide up to 195 mobile food pantries per year in under-served communities and schools.
  • Serve up to 250 low-income families at each mobile food pantry.


Long Term Success


Having enough community hunger-relief resources to provide accessible fresh, nutritious food to low-income families, children, the working-poor, seniors, veterans and people in need.





Program Success Monitoring
Program success is monitored by the Director of Operations and Director of Programs.
Program Success Examples

Edgar, 18, was at the mobile pantry at Whistlers Cove apartments with his mother, Rosa; brothers Angel, 10, and Edwin, 11; and sister, Marlene, 6.

 

The food the family receives from the mobile pantry “benefits us a lot,” Edgar said. “It might give us some things here that we might not be able to buy at the store.”

 

When his dad goes grocery shopping, he buys necessities like laundry detergent, Edgar said. “This gives you some extras.”

 

Edgar is attending college in the fall at Florida SouthWestern State College as a business major. “I plan to get my general contracting license, own my own business, and work for myself,” Edgar said.

 

Description

Approximately 30% of the food we provide to our clients is fresh produce that is donated by growers. These donations enable us to promote nutrition by providing fresh fruits and vegetables to clients who typically cannot afford or do not have access to such food. 

Budget $1,600,000
Category Human Services, General/Other Human Services, General/Other
Program Linked to Organizational Strategy Yes
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Short Term Success

In fiscal year 2017-2018, the Food Bank expects to distribute 5.25 million pounds of fresh produce. 






In FY 2018, the Harry Chapin Food Bank expects to distribute 5.25 million pounds of fresh produce.






Long Term Success

Having enough community hunger-relief resources to provide accessible fresh, nutritious food to low-income families, children, the working-poor, seniors, veterans and people in need.


Program Success Monitoring
Director of Operations; Director of Programs
Program Success Examples

Brighter Bites: The Harry Chapin Food Bank has partnered with Lipman Family Farms and the nonprofit organization Brighter Bites to deliver fresh produce to select schools in Collier County. Families in this program also receive nutrition education and information about the food they receive.

 

Good Food Is Good Medicine: We have partnered with Lee Health in a study of low-income patients who are hypertensive and struggle with hunger. Through the study Good Food Is Good Medicine, we supply nutritious food to Lee Health’s patients and their families once a week at select locations. The goal of the study is to determine whether access to nutritious food diminishes their hypertension.

Description

We provide quality food to more than 150 nonprofit organizations that directly serve clients in Charlotte, Collier, Glades, Hendry, and Lee counties. These agencies operate food pantries, after-school programs, soup kitchens, and other feeding programs. Two-thirds of the food they provide to clients comes from the Harry Chapin Food Bank. By partnering with us, these organizations are able to focus their attention on what they do best: serving people in need. 

Budget $2,600,000
Category Human Services, General/Other
Program Linked to Organizational Strategy Yes
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent At-Risk Populations Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Short Term Success The Food Bank will continue to provide quality food to more than 150 nonprofit organizations that directly serve clients in Charlotte, Collier, Glades, Hendry and Lee counties.  
Long Term Success  

Under-served communities will have enough hunger-relief resources to provide accessible fresh, nutritious food to low-income families, children, the working-poor, seniors, veterans and people in need.

Program Success Monitoring Program success is monitored by the Director of Operations and the Director of Programs.
Program Success Examples Her name was Misty. She looked pale and tired. She sat in the crowded sanctuary at a church, holding her son, Junior, close. They were all waiting for their number to be called so they could get food from the church food pantry.

 

Besides Junior 3, who is autistic, she cares for three other children at home. “My husband is the only one working,” she said. “I can’t go work myself.”

 

The family needs the food “because it’s hard, hard financially,” she said. “It helps us out a great deal when we run low on food again. It eases our stress a little bit knowing there is food in the house. Every little bit helps.”

Description  Many school-age children experience hunger, particularly on weekends when they are not being fed at school. The mission of the In-school Pantry Program is to help solve child hunger by providing nutritious food to children and their families when they need it most, in convenient, familiar, and safe locations. In- school pantries operate within the school, and enlist the school staff and parents to distribute food kits to hungry families in low-income areas. These pantries not only feed kids, they increase parents’ involvement in the academic lives of their children.
Budget $150,000
Category Human Services, General/Other Children & Youth Services
Program Linked to Organizational Strategy Yes
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent At-Risk Populations Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Short Term Success  In fiscal year 2018, the Harry Chapin Food Bank expects to open two additional in-school pantries,serving an estimated 100 students and their families  per school throughout the school year.
Long Term Success  

Having enough community hunger-relief resources to provide accessible fresh, nutritious food to low-income families, children, the working-poor, seniors, veterans and people in need.

Program Success Monitoring Program success is monitored by the Director of Programs and Director of Operations.
Program Success Examples Children with empty stomachs do not have the energy to focus, engage, learn, and grow. Poor nutrition also has a long-term negative effect on a child’s future physical and mental health, academic achievement, and economic productivity. Two-thirds of children in Southwest Florida public schools are eligible for or receive free meals at school. The In-school Pantry Program is growing annually to reach additional students in high-need schools. 
Description

The Care & Share: Senior Feeding Campaign supplements the diets of 2,200 low-income, hungry seniors in Charlotte, Collier, and Lee counties with nutritious, easy-to prepare food. Seniors receive food kits containing canned fruits and vegetables, protein, grains, cereal, and other food each month. When available, fresh produce is included with the kits. 

Budget $1,100,000
Category Human Services, General/Other Senior Services
Program Linked to Organizational Strategy Yes
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent At-Risk Populations Elderly and/or Disabled
Short Term Success  Continue to supplement the diets of 2,200 low-income, hungry seniors in Charlotte, Collier, and Lee counties with nutritious, easy-to prepare food. 
Long Term Success  

Having enough community hunger-relief resources to provide accessible fresh, nutritious food to low-income  seniors, families, children, the working-poor, veterans and people in need.

Program Success Monitoring Senior Hunger Coordinator
Program Success Examples  

A longtime SWFL resident in her 70s lives alone with no relatives nearby.  After losing her job in 2008, she developed serious back problems and became unable to work. 

 

She was encouraged to visit food pantries and sign up for the senior food program, which provides 2 extra bags of food each month to seniors who qualify.  She was hesitant to ask for help, because she was taught “as long as you can make it, you don’t need help.”
 

She further stated, “Even with the help of local food pantries, it can still cost $100 - $150  a month to buy food.”  The food she receives “is a very big help.” The extra food she receives makes all the difference. Without the help, she said,  “Do like most seniors, don’t eat.  What else is there?  Can’t afford to order food in, and can’t afford to go anywhere. It helps seniors out financially, it helps them actually have healthy food and able to keep their spirits up.  If you don’t eat, you go downhill fast.”

CEO/Executive Director
CEO/Executive Director Richard LeBer
CEO Term Start Feb 2016
CEO/Executive Director Email rleber@harrychapinfoodbank.org
Experience

President and CEO Richard LeBer has a long career of community involvement, transformation and impact, with deep experience in the for-profit and nonprofit sectors, particularly food banking, fundraising, board leadership, strategy and operations. LeBer has held numerous leadership positions, including interim executive director of the Florida Association of Food Banks, vice president at the Atlanta Community Food Bank and CEO of National Linen Service. 

LeBer is on the advisory board of the Executive Leadership Program for Nonprofit Executives in Georgia, past chairman of the board of the Atlanta Community Food Bank and former board member of the Georgia Mountain Food Bank. LeBer is a graduate of Harvard Business School and the University of Waterloo in Canada. LeBer is married and has two grown children. 

 

Former CEOs/Executive Directors
NameTerm
Senior Staff
NameTitle
Eric Hitzeman Operations Director
Kari LaFort Programs Director
Dave Najar Director of Administration, Technology, Finance
Miriam Pereira Development Director
Anna Suarez Director of HR & Administration
Staff & Volunteer Statistics
Full Time Staff 54
Part Time Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate % 89
Professional Development Yes
Contractors 0
Volunteers 6100
Management Reports to Board Yes
CEO/Executive Director Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non-Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Collaborations

HCFB collaborates with more than 150 nonprofit partner agencies in Charlotte, Collier, Glades, Hendry and Lee countries for the distribution of food to 28,000 people each week.  

Affiliations
AffiliationYear
Feeding America
Florida Association of Food Banks
United Way Member Agency
AFP (Association of Fundraising Professionals)
External Assessments and Accreditations
Assessment/AccreditationYear
American Institute of Baking (AIB)2017
Awards & Recognition
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
AIB CertificationAmerican Institute of Baking2017
Risk Management Provisions
Government Licenses
Organization Licensed by the Government No
Plans
Fundraising Plan No
Communication Plan No
Strategic Plan No
Strategic Plan Years
Strategic Plan Adopted 0
Management Succession Plan No
Continuity of Operations Plan No
Policies
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy No
Policies and Procedures Yes
Comments
Multi-Media Comments by Organization

 

Board Chair
Board Chair Anne Rose
Company Affiliation Lee Health
Board Term July 2017 to June 2018
Board Chair Email
Board Members
Board Members
NameAffiliation
John Clinger V.P. - Clinger, Sizemore & Associates
William Dillon Buchanan Ingersoll & Rooney
David Fry Community Volunteer
Jan-Erik Hustrulid Owen-Ames-Kimball Company
C. Robert Leadbetter Volunteer
Mark Levine Starkweather & Shepley Insuance
Jeffrey Maddox Maddox Construction Company
Maura Matzko Community Volunteer
Pat Nevins Volunteer
James Nolte Wells Fargo Advisors
Kayla Richmond Henderson, Franklin, Starnes & Holt, P.A.
Anne Rose Lee Memorial Health System
Bianca Ross Drug Free Hendry County Community Coalition
P.Keith Scoggins Jr.Attorney, Retired General Counsel Farm Credit System
Lois Thome WINK News Anchor
Constituency Includes Client Representation No
Board Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 14
Hispanic/Latino 1
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Gender
Male 10
Female 5
Unspecified 0
Governance
Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Board Orientation Yes
Number of Full Board Meetings Annually 5
Board Meeting Attendance % 93
Board Self-Evaluation Yes
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Board Conflict of Interest Policy Yes
% of Board Making Monetary Contributions 100
% of Board Making In-Kind Contributions 100
Standing Committees
Board Governance
Finance
Executive
Current Year Projections
Tax Year Start Month July
Tax Year Start Day 01
Tax Year Begins 2017
Tax Year End Month June
Tax Year End Day 30
Tax Year Ends 2018
Projected Revenue $37,874,000.00
Projected Expenses $37,293,000.00
Organization has Endowment Yes
Endowment Value $27,447.00
Capital Campaign
Currently In a Capital Campaign No
Anticipate Campaign within 5 years? No
Campaign Purpose
Campaign Goal
Amount Raised To Date 0 as of 0
Financial Review
Revenue SourcesHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201720162015
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$0$0$0
Government Contributions$11,077,780$4,726,757$1,971,170
Federal$0$0$0
State$0$0$0
Local$0$0$0
Unspecified$11,077,780$4,726,757$1,971,170
Individual Contributions$29,128,763$29,200,770$30,346,647
$225,380$256,826$264,755
($245,174)($119,043)$157,555
Investment Income, Net of Losses$5,453$644$2,396
Membership Dues$0$0$0
Special Events$841,362$1,435,384$1,432,775
Revenue In-Kind$35,351,038$29,390,175$28,140,172
Other$42,325$16,185$24,942
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201720162015
Program Expense$39,098,957$34,366,880$32,441,604
Administration Expense$341,328$340,518$299,663
Fundraising Expense$1,107,817$931,179$887,676
Payments to Affiliates$0$0$0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.011.001.02
Program Expense/Total Expenses96%96%96%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue3%3%3%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201720162015
Total Assets$9,160,030$8,298,572$8,931,040
Current Assets$3,914,012$2,673,662$4,106,424
Long-Term Liabilities$2,147,086$1,889,177$2,184,957
Current Liabilities$416,391$340,619$557,253
Total Net Assets$6,596,563$6,068,776$6,189,830
Top Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201720162015
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountContributions, gifts, grants $29,128,763Contributions, gifts, grants $29,200,770Contributions, gifts, grants $30,346,647
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountGovernment Grants - Unspecified $11,077,780Government Grants - Unspecified $4,726,757Government Grants - Unspecified $1,971,170
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountFundraising $841,362Fundraising $1,435,384Fundraising $1,432,775
CEO/Executive Director Compensation $150,001 - $175,000
Tax Credits No
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201720162015
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities9.407.857.37
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201720162015
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets23%23%24%
Financials Comments
Financial Comments by Foundation Financial information taken from audited financial statements.  Individual contributions include foundation and corporate support.  Federal tax returns and audited financial statements reconcile.  Financial information for 2015 taken solely from the Federal tax return as the uploaded audited financial statements include only the cover letter from the auditors and no financial information. 
Nonprofit Harry Chapin Food Bank of Southwest Florida, Inc.
Address 3760 Fowler Street
Fort Myers, FL 33901
Phone 239 334-7007

THE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION OF SARASOTA COUNTY, INC. IS A REGISTERED 501(C)(3) NON-PROFIT CORPORATION. A COPY OF THE OFFICIAL REGISTRATION AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE DIVISION OF CONSUMER SERVICES BY CALLING TOLL-FREE WITHIN THE STATE (1-800-HELP-FLA) OR FROM THE WEBSITE: WWW.FRESHFROMFLORIDA.COM. REGISTRATION DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT, APPROVAL, OR RECOMMENDATION BY THE STATE. ONE HUNDRED PERCENT (100%) OF EACH CONTRIBUTION IS RECEIVED BY THE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION OF SARASOTA COUNTY. REGISTRATION #SC-2471.