Southeastern Guide Dogs, Inc.
4210 77th Street East
Palmetto FL 34221
Mission
The mission of Southeastern Guide Dogs is to transform lives by creating and nurturing extraordinary partnerships between people and dogs.
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Titus Herman
Board Chair John Whitcomb
Board Chair Affiliation Whitcomb Real Estate
General Info
Tax Exempt Status Public Supported Charity
Incorporation Year 1982
Awarded competitive grant from Community Foundation in the last 5 years? Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes May 2017
State Registration Yes 0
Financial Summary
 
 
Projected Revenue $9,300,000.00
Projected Expenses $9,300,000.00
IRS Letter of Determination
2013 IRS Determination LetterView
Impact Statement

Southeastern Guide Dogs enjoyed another year of achievement, honor, and impact thanks to our dedicated family of volunteers, staff members, and supporters. We opened two new buildings and began constructing another facility as part of our plan to complete a world-class infrastructure in the realm of working dog organizations. In September 2016, we moved into the Barpal-Hirst Student Center, a multi-purpose facility that houses our students and their dogs during our residential training programs along with our administrative staff members in a purposefully-built structure that also serves as an event and meeting place. We also opened a brand new Puppy Academy where we will whelp between 250-275 puppies each year in state-of-the-art surroundings designed for their health, comfort, and early education. Our planned Guide Dog University is in the early stages of construction and will include climate-controlled residence halls for all of our dogs in training as well as a large, indoor training arena.

This year marks a new phase in our organization’s strategic plan that includes our mission statement, vision, core values, and strategic pillars, which all revolve around our theme of quality over quantity. The goals we aspire to emphasize our dedication to excellence, our uncompromising integrity, and passion for the care and well-being of our dogs. As we continue to focus on providing exemplary service to our 500 graduate dog teams while placing 90-100 new guide and service dogs annually, our top priority is providing exceptional experiences to those who need our extraordinary dogs.

Needs Statement
Student Scholarship: Your gift of $5,000 helps support a student’s 20-day residential training on our Palmetto, Florida, campus. You’ll receive a brief student biography accompanied by a photo of the student with his or her new dog in harness.
 
Puppy Naming Sponsorship: With a gift of $5,000, you earn the opportunity to name one of our wonderful puppies.  You’ll receive periodic photos and updates showing your sponsored puppy's growth and progress, beginning when it goes home with its volunteer puppy raiser at 2-3 months old. This puppy portrait, taken at 6-weeks-old, is followed by a 6-month photo update and another when the puppy turns one-year-old. When it returns to our campus for training at approximately 14-16 months old, you will receive another photo. You will also receive notification of the dog’s placement, whether as a guide dog, service dog, or in an alternate career. 
 
Graduation Sponsorship: Any individual, company, or organization can provide the $5,000 sponsorship of a graduation, the special celebratory lunch honoring a class’ achievements that is enjoyed together with their friends and families.
 
Dog-in-Training Scholarship: A $2,500 donation will support the formal harness training and education of a dog in our Guide Dog University program.
Background Statement

Southeastern Guide Dogs has the distinction of being dually accredited by the two premier, global accreditation bodies: the International Guide Dog Federation (IGDF) and Assistance Dogs International (ADI). Founded in 1982, this national organization employs the latest in canine development and behavior research to train guide dogs, service dogs, and companion dogs for people living with significant challenges, including those with visual impairments and veterans with disabilities. Southeastern Guide Dogs serves more than 450 graduates across the U.S. and continues to place more than 100 dogs into service careers each year. The charity provides all of its services free of charge and receives no government funding.

As the only accredited guide dog school in the southeastern United States, our organization began in 1982 with a small kennel built in a corner of an Apollo Beach landowner's property. In 1983, we hired a professional trainer to train the six dogs housed in the kennel for guide dog work, and the following year we graduated our first four guide dog pairs. Word about our organization quickly spread among the visually impaired community, and demand for our skilled guide dogs increased. Over time, we purchased contiguous parcels of land and created a beautiful 33-acre campus in Palmetto, Florida, where we continue to breed, raise, and train our amazing dogs.
 
We have now created more than 3,000 guide dog teams comprising deserving students and superbly trained dogs. We often say, “If these sidewalks could talk,” they’d tell stories of countless hours of struggle as the visually impaired have overcome their fears and trusted their steps to their dogs, of new confidence and hope emerging from hands on a harness paired with the unconditional love of a dog. And, for the past decade, they have also witnessed veterans with disabilities find renewed independence, mobility, and dignity through the love and loyalty of exceptional service dogs.
 
As a registered 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, we work with an annual operating budget of $10 million, relying 100% on donations from our community of supporters. We employ more than 100 dedicated staff members and rely on more than 700 core volunteers to succeed in the pursuit of our mission to transform lives with our amazing dogs.
 
And every day, because of that mission, we witness small but significant miracles emerge from the extraordinary partnerships of people and dogs.
Areas Served
Areas Served
Area
Throughout the United States
Areas Served Comments
We serve individuals throughout the 48 contiguous United States.
Service Categories
Primary Org Type Human Services
Secondary Org Type Animal Related
Tertiary Org Type Human Services
Statement from the Board Chair/Board President
As the Board of Directors, we assume the fiscal responsibilities of Southeastern Guide Dogs with a sense of gratitude and purpose, coupled with a profound level of responsibility. Your trust in us is well placed. Our Board, Finance Committee and Audit Committee work in concert with the CEO and staff to ensure that your financial contributions are carefully managed and thoughtfully applied to the fulfillment of the school’s mission. After all, careful financial management is the most concrete expression of gratitude we can show to you, our donors. We are fortunate, indeed, to have such a wonderful and supportive family – and humbled by your ceaseless generosity. Thank you for your continued support.
Statement from the CEO/Executive Director
Southeastern Guide Dogs is in the process of implementing a new, comprehensive Five-Year Strategic Plan that expands on the progress we made following our previous five-year plan. Beginning with our mission, vision, and core values as a framework on which to build, our plan revolves around quality over quantity. We will continue transforming lives by creating and nurturing extraordinary partnerships between people and dogs on our way to becoming the best service dog school in the world.  With our core values of respect and compassion, integrity and transparency, excellence and innovation, as well as passion for the care and well-being of our dogs and practicing mindful stewardship of our precious resources guiding us, we will continue placing our amazing dogs into careers benefiting people with visual impairments and veterans with disabilities. We will also continue to focus on providing exemplary service to our 500 graduate teams and to the 90-100 new guide dog and service dog placements we make each year. These numbers are based on an annual budget approximating $10 million, our current breeding rate and average litter size, the space constraints of our campus, and our current staffing patterns. We look forward to keeping you, our supporters, updated on the progress we intend to make over the next several years with our five strategic pillars of extraordinary dogs, exceptional experiences, passionate investors, world-class talent, and state-of-the-art infrastructure providing a strong foundation.
Programs
Description

Guide Dog Program

Our Guide Dog Program matches visually impaired individuals with impeccably trained guide dogs, providing a priceless, independent lifestyle. Our dogs have learned over 40 commands, so students must learn, too. For 20 days, students live on our welcoming Palmetto, Florida, campus. With our professional trainers and hand-picked dogs, teams venture from our secluded Freedom Walk to Bradenton, downtown Sarasota, Tampa, and beyond. They gain confidence navigating streets, stairs, elevators, malls, buses, airports, beaches and more.  After graduation, we provide lifetime follow-up and support.
Budget $4,718,052
Category Human Services, General/Other Services for Individuals with Disabilities
Program Linked to Organizational Strategy Yes
Population Served Adults
Short Term Success

Once accepted to our program, the students spend 20 days on our campus, where our trainers teach them how to use their new guide dogs. This begins on Freedom Walk, a winding mile-and-a-half-long path on our beautifully landscaped 33-acre campus. This secluded environment gives our students the confidence they need to step outside and place their trust and safety in a dog they have just met. Training moves off-campus and gets increasingly challenging as the 20-day curriculum progresses. Short-term program success is measured at various points throughout the training curriculum.

At the end of the training, we also administer student exit surveys with questions evaluating our trainers, the course material itself, and our facilities. During the past 24 months, we have surpassed our goal of meeting or exceeding our students' expectations at least 90 percent of the time, with a 97 percent satisfaction rating.

 
Long Term Success
Our Guide Dog Program increases visually impaired individuals' mobility, independence, and opportunity for safe travel. After graduating from the program, participants have the skills and confidence to use their new guide dogs to take advantage of professional, educational, and social opportunities. Typically, a person works his or her guide dog for approximately eight years, until the dog is retired and a new guide dog is obtained. Our graduate services department consists of certified guide dog trainers who provide ongoing training and assistance to the guide dog team for as long as it is actively working. The long-term success of the program is extended with each guide dog a person receives.
 
We evaluate this success with graduate surveys, completed after the students return home with their dogs that assess the students' quality of life since receiving their guide dogs as well as asking whether they would return to Southeastern Guide Dogs for another dog in the future. 
Program Success Monitoring

Program Goals and Objectives
The goal of our Guide Dog Program is to provide veterans who are visually impaired with increased mobility, freedom, and opportunity for safe travel by pairing them with guide dogs.

Our objective is for at least 90 percent of participants to rate their 20-day training experience on our campus as having met or exceeded their expectations. Questions include whether:

 * Our training curriculum met their learning expectations

* They perceived their trainers had sufficient expertise to teach them

* They felt like their time during training was well spent

* They would recommend Southeastern Guide Dogs to others

Program Success Examples

Darrell, a 19-year-old from Sarasota, suffers from retinitis pigmentosa and astigmatism in his left eye. His sight began failing him around age six, but his condition wasn’t diagnosed until age 12. Darrell’s mother spotted our Discovery Center in Sarasota and, not long after that, Darrell visited our main campus in Palmetto, took his first steps on a test walk with one of our guide dogs, and was hooked. “I loved it!” he said.

We paired Darrell with an adorable yellow Labrador named Lucky. “She reminds me of Roger Rabbit – bouncing all over the place. She is hysterical in the play yard and is very friendly, which is a good thing and a bad thing – I call her a blonde Lab,” he said.

Having a guide dog has given Darrell the confidence to attend the Orientation & Adjustment School in Daytona to take business courses about how to run concession stands. “It’s something for me to do for now, and I’m looking forward to getting out and working with Lucky,” he said.

Description

Veterans Program

The Southeastern Guide Dogs Veterans Program trains and provides assistance dogs for military members as well as on-campus instruction for our students and lifetime post-graduation follow-up support for all the dog and veteran teams. It includes five different categories of dogs to serve a range of needs among our heroic veterans:

Guide Dogs – Learning 40 different commands, these dogs are professionally trained to serve visually impaired veterans.

Service Dogs - Offering loving support and loyalty as well as a daily rhythm and purpose for their owners, service dogs are trained to provide independence and confidence to veterans with disabilities, including post-traumatic stress disorder, hearing loss, balance issues, and more . 

Facility Therapy Dogs These dogs are handpicked to spread cheer and bring encouragement to wounded warriors who are recovering in veterans' medical centers.

Emotional Support Dogs - Well-behaved dogs are selected to offer loyal companionship and emotional support to veterans and their families.
 
Gold Star Family Dogs - Dogs with a calm, peaceful demeanor are specially chosen to provide love, comfort, and support to families who have lost loved ones in service to our country. 
 
 
Budget $2,144,897
Category Human Services, General/Other Services for Individuals with Disabilities
Program Linked to Organizational Strategy Yes
Population Served Adults
Short Term Success Once accepted to our program, visually impaired veterans spend 20 days on our campus learning how to use their new guide dogs. (The program is 12 days for sighted veterans learning to use their new veteran assistance dogs.) Training begins on Freedom Walk, a winding mile-and-a-half-long path on our beautifully landscaped 33-acre campus. This secluded environment gives veterans the confidence they need to step outside and place their trust and safety in a dog they have just met. Training moves off-campus and gets increasingly challenging as the curriculum progresses. Short-term program success is measured at various points throughout the training curriculum. Veterans are not allowed to progress to the next training module until they have mastered the one they are currently working on. At the end of the training period, we have created new guide dog teams and veteran assistance dog teams that are ready to return home and go anywhere – forward together, as we say.
Long Term Success

The long-term success of guide dogs and assistance dogs paired with veterans through our program is the veterans’ increased mobility, independence, and opportunity for safe travel, as well as a renewed sense of dignity and hope. The program gives veterans the skills and confidence to use their new dogs to take advantage of the professional, educational, and social opportunities life has to offer.

Typically, visually impaired veterans and sighted veterans living with PTSD work their dogs for approximately eight years, until the dogs are retired and new ones are obtained. Our graduate services department consists of certified dog trainers who are available to provide ongoing training and assistance to the guide and service dog teams for as long as the teams are together. The long-term success of the program is extended with each new dog a veteran receives.

Program Success Monitoring

Program Goals and Objectives

The goal of our Veterans Program is to provide veterans who are visually impaired and those with PTSD with increased mobility, freedom, and opportunity for safe travel by pairing them with guide and service dogs, as well as providing those recovering in medical facilities with encouragement to heal and military families with support, love, and hope.

Our objective is for at least 90 percent of veterans to rate their 20-day training experience on our campus as having met or exceeded their expectations. Questions include whether:

 * Our training curriculum met veterans' learning expectations

* Our trainers provided timely feedback to veterans during their training

* Veterans perceived their trainers had sufficient background knowledge to teach the material

* Veterans felt like their time during training was well spent

* Veterans would recommend Southeastern Guide Dogs to others

Program Success Examples

Retired Marine Corporal Michael Jernigan isn't your ordinary veteran. He is a Purple Heart and Combat Action Ribbon recipient, and he and his guide dog Brittani are frequent guests in high-profile circles in Washington, D.C.  

Michael, a third-generation marine, was proudly serving in Iraq when his Humvee was struck by a roadside bomb. He lost both eyes, and suffered a crushed cranium and severe trauma to his right hand and left knee. Somehow he survived, recovered from his injuries, and learned to live with his blindness with the help Brittani, whom he received through our Veterans Program.  

“When I was wounded, I was very scared,” Mike said. “Could I take care of myself? Could I even go out? The fears just festered there during all of those months of recovery. Now with Brittani by my side, I’m back to my old self. I can travel the country alone, I’ve gone back to college and I can get around campus on my own. And I’m never scared.”

Description

Gifted Canines


Dogs not suited to serve as guide or service dogs are career changed and enter our Gifted Canines program where other careers await them. These other careers are important and provide great value to people in need of a miracle.

Canine Connections Dogs – selects gentle companion dogs for visually impaired children ages 10 – 17, building a bridge toward a future guide by acclimating the children to the responsibilities and joys of dog ownership

Public Service Dogs – uses dogs with specific aptitudes for careers in search-and-rescue and arson, bomb, and drug detection

Ambassador Dogs – places dogs with active volunteers providing outreach, education, and comfort to those in hospitals, nursing homes, hospices, and schools

Budget $437,346
Category Human Services, General/Other Services for Individuals with Disabilities
Program Linked to Organizational Strategy Yes
Population Served General/Unspecified
Short Term Success

Southeastern Guide Dogs calls the family of the visually impaired child at scheduled intervals soon after placing the dog with the child to determine whether the child needs ongoing training and support related to handling the dog.

Our certified dog trainers will observe the child’s dog handling skills (and provide training as needed), assess the dog's appearance (weight, nails, etc.), and educate the child and his or her family about the guide dog lifestyle.

Long Term Success

The long-term goal in placing a Canine Connections dog with a visually impaired child is for the child to experience the responsibilities and joys of dog ownership before they are old enough (at least 18 years old) to receive a guide dog from our school.

We receive written reports from the parents of the child describing the impact the dog has made in the child’s life (e.g., leaves the house more frequently, improved confidence and/or self-esteem, etc). No one is in a better position to describe the positive differences in the lives of their children “before and after” receiving Canine Connections dogs than the children’s parents.

Program Success Monitoring Reports and communication from the parents of the children we match with dogs show the powerful impact this program has on the children and their families. 
Program Success Examples

My son Nico was diagnosed with Rentinitis Pigmentosa when he was 9 years old. Today he is a 14-year-old boy struggling with being a teen and vision loss at the same time. It has been difficult to watch his vision deteriorate while his self-confidence wanes and his self-esteem falters. 

When I heard about the Canine Connections program, I got in touch with the school, which said a small roly-poly black lab named Patches would be the perfect companion dog for Nico.  From the moment Patches walked in our house and gave Nico a quick lick on the face and a wag of the tail – they have been inseparable. 

Patches instinctively knows when Nico needs her and is quick to be by his side. She gives him the self-confidence to do things on his own and has taken our focus off of Nico’s vision loss and given him a greater sense of freedom and control of his life than he’s ever had. It is hard to explain in mere words what Patches has done for the soul of a boy like Nico in just a few short months.

Comments
Program Comments by Organization

Statement from the CEO

 

Southeastern Guide Dogs is in the process of implementing a comprehensive five-year strategic plan focusing on excellence in all we do: Excellence in dog breeding and training. Excellence in serving our students and graduates. Excellence in the stewardship of our funding. 

 

Thanks to a strong vision, careful planning and dedicated leadership, Southeastern Guide Dogs is well on its way to setting new standards of quality in the national and international guide dog industry. With our mission as our guide, we are changing the lives of the visually impaired in unique and productive ways, and we have carefully aligned ourselves for success. We look forward to keeping you, our supporters, updated on the progress we intend to make over the next several years.

 

Statement from the Board Chair

 

As the Board of Directors, we assume the fiscal responsibilities of Southeastern Guide Dogs with a sense of gratitude and purpose, coupled with a profound level of responsibility. Your trust in us is well placed. Our Board, Finance Committee and Audit Committee work in concert with the CEO and staff to ensure that your financial contributions are carefully managed and thoughtfully applied to the fulfillment of the school’s mission.

 

After all, careful financial management is the most concrete expression of gratitude we can show to you, our donors. We are fortunate, indeed, to have such a wonderful and supportive family – and humbled by your ceaseless generosity. Thank you for your continued support.

CEO/Executive Director
CEO/Executive Director Titus Herman
CEO Term Start Feb 2008
CEO/Executive Director Email titus.herman@guidedogs.org
Experience Titus Herman joined Southeastern Guide Dogs in February 2008, after 12 years of service as the marketing and planning executive for Goodwill Industries in Portland, Oregon, and five years of service as the marketing executive for Goodwill Industries in Sarasota, Florida.
Former CEOs/Executive Directors
NameTerm
Senior Staff
NameTitle
Joel Clark Vice President, Information Management and Capital Projects
Dr. Kevin Conrad Vice President, Canine Development and Mission Fulfillment
Stacy Howe Vice President, Marketing and Communications
Andy Kramer Vice President, Philanthropy
Gloria Manzenberger Vice President, Finance and Risk Management
Shannon Starline Vice President, Human Resources and Volunteer Services
Staff & Volunteer Statistics
Full Time Staff 115
Part Time Staff 21
Staff Retention Rate % 30
Professional Development Yes
Contractors 3
Volunteers 750
Management Reports to Board Yes
CEO/Executive Director Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non-Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Collaborations
We currently have no ongoing collaborations.
External Assessments and Accreditations
Assessment/AccreditationYear
Assistance Dogs International Inc.
Awards & Recognition
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Hometown Hero AwardTampa Bay Lightning2012
Nonprofit of the Year award in the Environment & Animals categoryTampa Bay Business Journal2012
Non Profit of the YearTampa Bay Business Journal2014
Non Profit of the YearTampa Bay Business Journal2014
Hometown Hero AwardTampa Bay Lightning 2015
Risk Management Provisions
Government Licenses
Organization Licensed by the Government No
Plans
Fundraising Plan No
Communication Plan No
Strategic Plan Yes
Strategic Plan Years 3
Strategic Plan Adopted Oct 2012
Management Succession Plan No
Continuity of Operations Plan Yes
Policies
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy No
Policies and Procedures Yes
Board Chair
Board Chair John Whitcomb
Company Affiliation Whitcomb Real Estate
Board Term Jan 2017 to Jan 2018
Board Chair Email
Board Members
Board Members
NameAffiliation
John Auer ASI
David Barnhart Barnhart Guess Retail Properties
Ray Bishop Goodwill Industries, North Georgia
Scott Collins Fiduciary Wealth Advisors
John Compton Norton, Hammersley, Lopez & Skokos
Kenneth Folkman Kenneth Michael & Associates
Timothy Griffy Ernst & Young
Gary Johnson Unipress Corporation
Lea LeVines BNY Mellon
Robert Meade Doctor's Hospital of Sarasota
Robert Newman J.C. Newman Cigar Company
Roger Pettingell Coldwell Banker Real Estate
Kathleen Riley Riley Solutions
Katharine Saunders self-employed
Harris Silverman MDThe Eye Associates
Dulce Weisenborn Miami Dade College
John Whitcomb Whitcomb Real Estate
Eric Williams Community Volunteer
Board Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 18
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Gender
Male 14
Female 4
Unspecified
Governance
Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 3
Board Orientation Yes
Number of Full Board Meetings Annually 6
Board Meeting Attendance % 81
Board Self-Evaluation Yes
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Board Conflict of Interest Policy Yes
% of Board Making Monetary Contributions 100
% of Board Making In-Kind Contributions 0
Fiscal Year Projections
Fiscal Year Begins 2016
Fiscal Year Ends 2017
Projected Revenue $9,300,000.00
Projected Expenses $9,300,000.00
Organization has Endowment Yes
Endowment Value $3,463,268.00
Endowment Spending Policy Income Only
Capital Campaign
Currently In a Capital Campaign No
Anticipate Campaign within 5 years? Yes
Campaign Purpose
Campaign Goal
Campaign Dates 0 to 0
Amount Raised To Date 0 as of 0
IRS Form 990s
FY 2016 9902016
990 2014-20152015
Form 9902014
Form 9902013
9902012
9902011
9902010
9902009
9902008
Audit/Financial Documents
Historical Financial Review
Revenue SourcesHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201620152014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$78,621$69,183$71,733
Government Contributions$0$0$0
Federal$0$0$0
State$0$0$0
Local$0$0$0
Unspecified$0$0$0
Individual Contributions$17,496,475$14,732,275$8,143,977
$87,018$88,843$102,606
$84,235($82,703)($37,161)
Investment Income, Net of Losses$390,733$340,384$528,086
Membership Dues$0$0$0
Special Events$843,881$515,811$465,986
Revenue In-Kind$1,368,927$1,451,112$578,036
Other$53,900$144,341$142,594
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201620152014
Program Expense$6,041,804$5,719,877$5,930,729
Administration Expense$769,994$719,300$640,192
Fundraising Expense$1,062,465$985,085$530,697
Payments to Affiliates$0$0$0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses2.422.131.33
Program Expense/Total Expenses77%77%84%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue6%6%6%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201620152014
Total Assets$41,762,464$30,026,499$22,143,197
Current Assets$28,925,696$24,263,314$16,541,508
Long-Term Liabilities$0$0$0
Current Liabilities$1,102,381$464,297$487,571
Total Net Assets$40,660,083$29,562,202$21,655,626
Top Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201620152014
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountContributions, gifts, grants $17,496,475Contributions, gifts, grants $14,732,275Contributions, gifts, grants $8,143,977
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountFundraising $843,881Fundraising $515,811Investment Income $528,086
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountInvestment income $390,733Investment Income $304,384Fundraising $465,986
CEO/Executive Director Compensation
Tax Credits No
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities26.2452.2633.93
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Financials Comments
Financial Comments by Foundation Foundations and corporations are included with individual contributions as they are not separated in the 990 or audit.  Financial figures are taken from 990. Audit reports total assets of $19,002,342 in 2013, $17,694,716 in 2012, $17,101,719 in 2011, $17,481,849 in 2010; $16,784,120 in 2009; and $15,357,931 in 2008.
Nonprofit Southeastern Guide Dogs, Inc.
Address 4210 77th Street East
Palmetto, FL 34221
Phone 941 729-5665

THE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION OF SARASOTA COUNTY, INC. IS A REGISTERED 501(C)(3) NON-PROFIT CORPORATION. A COPY OF THE OFFICIAL REGISTRATION AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE DIVISION OF CONSUMER SERVICES BY CALLING TOLL-FREE WITHIN THE STATE (1-800-HELP-FLA) OR FROM THE WEBSITE: WWW.FRESHFROMFLORIDA.COM. REGISTRATION DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT, APPROVAL, OR RECOMMENDATION BY THE STATE. ONE HUNDRED PERCENT (100%) OF EACH CONTRIBUTION IS RECEIVED BY THE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION OF SARASOTA COUNTY. REGISTRATION #SC-02471.