The Food Addiction Institute Inc
1368 Georgetowne Circle
SARASOTA FL 34232-0331
Mission
Advocating widespread acceptance of food addiction as a disease of substance abuse and the availability of effective abstinence-based solutions.

Leadership
CEO/Executive Director No Executive Director
Board Chair Mark Cheren EdD
Board Chair Affiliation Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine
General Info
Former Names
LOUISVILLE FUND FOR ADULT CHILDREN INC
Tax Exempt Status Public Supported Charity
Incorporation Year 1992
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes Feb 2018
State Registration Yes Dec 2017
IRS Letter of Determination
View
Financial Summary
 
 
Projected Revenue $50,000.00
Projected Expenses $45,000.00
Impact Statement

Major Accomplishments in 2016:

  1. Continued to offer a Sarasota-Manatee-Charlotte County area recovery meal for food addicts, which has occurred monthly.
  2. Have continued to coordinate the Food Addiction Coalition to help food addicts in the Sarasota-Bradenton area.
  3. Have continued to offer a food addiction recovery training program for professionals in the field.
  4. Have begun to plan and in various ways prepare for the launching of a nationwide campaign, an outreach program intended to get more of those struggling with their use of food and those supporting and/or caring for them to bring up and seriously consider the possibility of food use disorder/food addiction during health care visits. It will be called the “Take Food Addiction Seriously” Campaign
  5. Have launched a series of Food Addiction Institute Webinars. Four have been presented so far. Video recordings of these webinars are now available for viewing on a new Food Addiction Institute YouTube Channel.

 

Needs Statement

Needs Statement: 

  1. Funds to support a part-time administrator for both local and international programs. Est. cost: $60,000.
  2. Funds to support a “Take Food Addiction Seriously” Campaign coordinator Est. cost: $24,000.
  3. Funds to support collaborative development and piloting of food addiction advocacy and education materials with the University of Massachusetts Medical School's Department of Psychiatry. Est. Cost: $75,000. 
  4. Support for two major scientific research initiatives:  (a) animal research on the possible addictive qualities of food additives, by Dr. Nicole Avena at Columbia University and (b) qualitative research on the problem of and solutions to food addiction denial, by Phil Werdell, Director of Food Addiction Professional Training for the Food Addiction Institute. Est. cost: $250,000.
Background Statement

pasting

The Food Addiction Institute was first incorporated in Kentucky as a 501(c)(3) organization under the name The Louisville Fund for Adult Children by Michael Ann Fultz and Becky Mayville in 1992. The first project was to develop a set of training films to teach addiction professionals about a new experiential mode therapy called Expressive Therapy, which Ms. Fultz and Ms. Mayville had created in their counseling center for alcoholics, drug addicts and adult children of addicts. The second project, again led by Ms. Fultz and Ms. Mayville, brought consultants Phil Werdell and Mary Foushi from Glenbeigh Psychiatric Hospital in Tampa, Florida and ACORN Food Dependency Recovery Services in Sarasota, Florida to do trainings for Louisville therapists in food addiction assessment and treatment. From this point, the Fund began to work exclusively in the area of food addiction and, in 2004, Ms. Mayville and Mr. Werdell organized a conference in Sarasota which led to the establishment of an international food addiction institute. The Fund began doing business as the Food Addiction Institute in 2009. 

The Food Addiction Institute was first incorporated in Kentucky as a 501(c)(3) organization under the name The Louisville Fund for Adult Children by Michael Ann Fultz and Becky Mayville in 1992. The first project was to develop a set of training films to teach addiction professionals about a new experiential mode therapy called Expressive Therapy, which Ms. Fultz and Ms. Mayville had created in their counseling center for alcoholics, drug addicts and adult children of addicts. The second project, again led by Ms. Fultz and Ms. Mayville, brought consultants Phil Werdell and Mary Foushi from Glenbeigh Psychiatric Hospital in Tampa, Florida and ACORN Food Dependency Recovery Services in Sarasota, Florida to do trainings for Louisville therapists in food addiction assessment and treatment. From this point, the Fund began to work exclusively in the area of food addiction and, in 2004, Ms. Mayville and Mr. Werdell organized a conference in Sarasota which led to the establishment of an international food addiction institute. The Fund began doing business as the Food Addiction Institute in 2009. 

Areas Served
Areas Served
Area
FL- Sarasota
FL- Manatee
FL- Charlotte
International
National
Service Categories
Primary Org Type Health Care
Secondary Org Type Food, Agriculture & Nutrition
Tertiary Org Type
Statement from the Board Chair/Board President

The Food Addiction Institute (FAI) has a national and international mission concerning food addiction awareness, education, treatment and recovery: Newly revised in January of 2017 by the FAI Board of Directors, our mission statement now reads as follows: “Advocating widespread acceptance of food addiction as a disease of substance abuse and educating the general public and healthcare professionals about the availability of effective, abstinence-based solutions.”

FAI has been working with people in this region to establish the basis for a major local demonstration project in support of food addiction recovery.

There is growing consciousness in the USA and internationally that some people can be addicted to specific foods. This is supported by substantial scientific evidence. Not everyone becomes addicted to food, but those who are addicted usually find that the disease is progressive, meaning it tends to continue and it tends to get worse over time if not aggressively and properly treated. And like other substance abuse addictions, for most afflicted with this condition, it is chronic, meaning it must be struggled with lifelong.

What is still missing in many current discussions of food addiction, is the understanding that food addiction involves loss of control. There is severe loss of control in food addiction, just as with alcoholism and other drug addictions. Thus, recovery from food addiction is increasingly difficult unless trigger foods are eliminated entirely from the food addict's diet and the individual is able to obtain an extraordinary level of support. That is, to maintain trigger food abstinence over the long term usually requires a great deal of help from peers and sometimes from professionals.

Food addiction, like other addictions, creates a subtle distortion of our sense of self-reliance. While it is important to take personal responsibility for what we eat, that does not mean that we are able to follow through on healthy choices by ourselves. People with food addiction need and deserve the best possible support, both personally, and in the form of wiser social policy that reduces the current food addiction fostering qualities of our societal environment.

All of the major organizations in society need to take responsibility for policies and practices regarding food and food addiction:

Statement from the CEO/Executive Director

A special shout-out to the people of Sarasota, Manatee and Charlotte Counties in Florida! The Food Addiction Institute has been physically based in Sarasota since 2004, but most of our work to date has been national and international. This has already begun to change. In 2013, we started a monthly local recovery meal for food addicts and friends of food addiction awareness. We have also supported a new Food Addiction Coalition. It, too, meets monthly. The coalition sponsors periodic weekend workshops offering an introduction to food addiction recovery. FAI professional training is now being held in western Florida in conjunction with the Florida School of Addiction Studies on an ongoing basis. We continue to do our best to direct resources and raise funds to bring the best food addiction education and treatment available in the world to our local community. We invite you to join us in this effort to create more reduced sugar and sugar-free environments, and to promote a better understanding of how to prevent food addiction is in our children and adults, and how to provide appropriate support and treatment services for all those who have become addicted to specific foods.

A special shout-out to the people of Sarasota, Manatee and Charlotte Counties in Florida! The Food Addiction Institute has been physically based in Sarasota since 2004, but most of our work to date has been national and international. This has already begun to change. In 2013, we started a monthly local recovery meal for food addicts and friends of food addiction awareness. We have also supported a new Food Addiction Coalition. It, too, meets monthly. The coalition sponsors periodic weekend workshops offering an introduction to food addiction recovery. FAI professional training is now being held in western Florida in conjunction with the Florida School of Addiction Studies on an ongoing basis. We continue to do our best to direct resources and raise funds to bring the best food addiction education and treatment available in the world to our local community. We invite you to join us in this effort to create more reduced sugar and sugar-free environments, and to promote a better understanding of how to prevent food addiction is in our children and adults, and how to provide appropriate support and treatment services for all those who have become addicted to specific foods.

Programs
Description

This chapter was formed in the summer of 2013 in the Sarasota-Bradenton-Charlotte County area, based on the model of local alcohol and drug addiction councils of the last several decades.  The main activities are centered around making this chapter of FAI a model of local best practices with respect to food addiction. We have been active in bringing awareness of food addiction education, treatment and recovery to both the public and area healthcare professionals. The chapter meets monthly to discuss and implement its goals.

Budget $1,200
Category Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, General/Other
Program Linked to Organizational Strategy Yes
Population Served Alcohol, Drug, Substance Abusers Adolescents Only (13-19 years) Adults
Short Term Success A monthly recovery meal has been held in Sarasota for the past two years and has supported the recovery of 15-20 people, introduced food addiction concepts to an additional 10-15 people and catalyzed a series of action programs including outreach to the American Psychological Association meeting in Orlando, FL and the Food Addiction Coalition.
Long Term Success The long-term goal is to develop dozens of recovery meal sites on a weekly basis throughout Sarasota, Manatee and Charlotte Counties.  
Program Success Monitoring Success of this program will be measured in number of meals held, number of people attending for the first time and number of people joining each group as a community and the number of food addiction initiatives coming out of each meal.
Program Success Examples Program success will be seen in the number of meals that are organized and held, the number of sites developed for meals, the number of newcomers and continuing supporters attending such meals and the number of food addiction community initiatives resulting from the meals.
Description This is a media, lecture and workshop conference program to create a knowledgeable citizenry and to train professionals in the basis of food addiction.  It includes the production and distribution of pamphlets, posters and press releases on food addiction. Its goal is to develop a network of self-assessed food addicts and health professionals committed to referring people to 12-Step fellowships and to developing a full range of professional services for food addiction in Sarasota, Manatee and Charlotte Counties.
Budget $75,000
Category Health Care, General/Other Public Health
Program Linked to Organizational Strategy Yes
Population Served Alcohol, Drug, Substance Abusers Adults Adolescents Only (13-19 years)
Short Term Success Currently, most of the members of the Food Addiction Coalition are themselves self-assessed recovering food addicts.  A goal for this year is to liaise with other professional coalitions to recruit a member for the food addiction coalition and to offer speakers at their monthly meetings.
Long Term Success Long-term goals include conducting an annual epidemiological study of food addiction in the three-county area, developing a body of knowledgeable citizens about food addiction and services that are most effective and a ladder of increasingly intense services beginning with professional assessment, including recovery groups, weekend retreats week-long workshops, outpatient clinics and a residential food addiction treatment program.
Program Success Monitoring Short-term success will be measured by an increase of membership from school, church, health, human service and business organizations and by the number of introductory lectures on food addiction at their meetings and at individual sites.
Program Success Examples This will be successful measured in terms of the percentage of community and business organizations that participate in the coalition and begin to initiate food addiction prevention programs of their own.
Description Food addiction recovery meals are an experiential introduction to food addiction recovery.  These are regular monthly meals in Sarasota and weekend retreats that started in January 2014.  The purpose is to show how people can eat in a healthy and delicious manner while being completely abstinent from specific addictive foods.  Another goal is to encourage food addicts to get together in a relaxed environment and share information about recovery with each other. 
Budget $100,000
Category Education, General/Other Education Policy Programs
Program Linked to Organizational Strategy Yes
Population Served Alcohol, Drug, Substance Abusers Adolescents Only (13-19 years) Adults
Short Term Success Short-term success will be measured by the development of a tri-fold brochure about food addiction that is comparable to brochures developed for smoking cessation, news and/or feature stories in the local media, a presentation of a one-day conference for leaders in the community and an experiential model weekend workshop for citizens interested in food addiction recovery.
Long Term Success Observation of a growing consciousness in the three-county area on the difference between obesity, food addiction and eating disorders.  Changes occurring involving family and health patterns regarding food and the emergence of support for food addiction that is comparable to that available for alcohol and drug addiction.
Program Success Monitoring Measurement will be determined by the number of public events produced, the amount of media developed and shifts in community knowledge and attitudes about food addiction.
Program Success Examples We will have a large shift in community knowledge and attitudes regarding food addiction and will become involved in a multitude of events and public media.
Description Healthcare professionals are given the knowledge and skills to practice competently in the field of food addiction recovery treatment.  They gain the latest scientific knowledge and are taught cutting-edge clinical practices.  
Budget $200,000
Category Education, General/Other Education Policy Programs
Program Linked to Organizational Strategy Yes
Population Served Adults US& International Alcohol, Drug, Substance Abusers
Short Term Success We will develop a model training at First Step of Sarasota for its therapists, at Kennedy-White Orthopedic Center for healthcare professionals and at one of the weight-loss businesses for instructors.
Long Term Success There will be doctors, clergy, businessmen, reporters, military recruiters, weight-loss providers and other professionals who know the difference between obesity, food addiction and eating disorders and who see practical ways in which they can make a difference in their own institutions. 
Program Success Monitoring Success will be determined by the number of trainings, the number of participants and standard before-and-after testing for knowledge.
Program Success Examples Enrollment of a small group of local professionals or professionals-in-training in the three-year experiential professional training program of the Food Addiction Institute.
Comments
Program Comments by Organization
Since 2004, the Food Addiction Institute has been primarily a volunteer organization.  The Board has decided to begin raising funds for staff-based projects.  A major focus for this, called "The Sarasota Project," builds on the successful work of the Fund in Louisville, Kentucky, from 1998-2002.  "The Louisville Project" was a three-year program to deepen the recovery base for late-stage food addicts, train professionals to deliver effective services and provide financial aid for those needing intensive and residential services who could not afford the total cost of treatment.  This work, in conjunction with First Step, the major local drug and alcohol treatment center, is leading to the first track of residential treatment for food addiction.  "The Sarasota Project" is much more extensive.  We plan to have administrative staff for the local Food Addiction Coalition and part-time staff to help integrate food addiction prevention and treatment throughout the community.  This will include work with elementary and high schools, local colleges, churches, medical practices, hospitals, restaurants and grocery businesses.
The local work will be enhanced by the Institute's ongoing participation in the Food Addiction Research Group of The University of Massachusetts Medical School.  With scientists and clinicians from the Northeast, we are developing educational material for patients, training material for health professionals, research on the percentage of food addiction in weight-loss and bariatric surgery programs and a proposed food addiction track for bariatric surgery.  This work is all directly applicable to the Sarasota-Manatee-Charlotte County community.
Also, the Institute is working with the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Florida toward the development of a world-class, five-year treatment program for impaired physicians and professionals.  Led by Dr. Mark Gold, one of the most prominent scientists in the field of addiction, this program will provide services for local health professionals with advanced food addiction.  It will also be a model of hospital-based primary treatment for food addiction, which has not been available since the 1980s and 1990s.
With Dr. Nicole Avena of Columbia University, the leading researcher on food addiction in the country, the Institute will be formulating areas of research particularly needed for individual food addiction recovery and improving clinical outcomes.  This will include research on food addiction denial, which is focused in the west Florida community.
The Institute will continue to cooperate with ACORN Food Addiction Recovery Services, a leading provider of workshop-based alternatives to inpatient treatment for food addiction throughout the United States and Europe.  ACORN is based in Sarasota, and we will encourage them -- partly through the raising of financial aid for their programs -- to increase the level of services in the Sarasota-Manatee-Charlotte County area.  ACORN will continue to be the administrator of the Institute's three-year Food Addiction Professional Training Program.
 
CEO/Executive Director
CEO/Executive Director No Executive Director
CEO Term Start 0
CEO/Executive Director Email N/A
Former CEOs/Executive Directors
NameTerm
Senior Staff
NameTitle
Staff & Volunteer Statistics
Full Time Staff 0
Part Time Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate % N/A
Professional Development Yes
Contractors 1
Volunteers 150
Management Reports to Board N/A
CEO/Executive Director Formal Evaluation N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation N/A
Non-Management Formal Evaluation No
Collaborations
University of Massachussets, Department of Psychiatry
First Step Drug and Alcohol Treatment Center of Sarasota
Impaired Physicians Treatment Program, University of Florida (Gainesville)
ACORN Food Dependency Recovery Services (Sarasota)
External Assessments and Accreditations
Assessment/AccreditationYear
Risk Management Provisions
Government Licenses
Organization Licensed by the Government No
Plans
Fundraising Plan No
Communication Plan No
Strategic Plan No
Strategic Plan Years
Strategic Plan Adopted 0
Management Succession Plan No
Continuity of Operations Plan No
Policies
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy No
Policies and Procedures No
Board Chair
Board Chair Mark Cheren EdD
Company Affiliation Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine
Board Term Jan 2014 to Dec 2017
Board Chair Email markcheren@gmail.com
Board Members
Board Members
NameAffiliation
Beth Rocchio Candon MDVolunteer Board Member
Mark Cheren EdDBoard Chair
Christy Correno Volunteer Board Member
Dave Evans author of leading alcohol and drug addiction law and consultant
Esther Helga Gudmundsdottir Community Volunteer/Member
Bitten Jonsson SSKCommunity Volunteer/Member
Cynthia Myers-Morrison EdDMember
Jamie Peal Totten EsqTreasurer
Phil Werdell Food Addiction Institute
David Avram Wolfe MS, RD, LDNVolunteer Board Member
Theresa Wright Member
Board Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 9
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Gender
Male 4
Female 7
Unspecified 0
Governance
Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 3
Board Orientation Yes
Number of Full Board Meetings Annually 4
Board Meeting Attendance % 93
Board Self-Evaluation No
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Board Conflict of Interest Policy Yes
% of Board Making Monetary Contributions 100
% of Board Making In-Kind Contributions 100
Standing Committees
Executive
Finance
Comments
Governance Comments by Organization Due to the international nature of The Food Addiction Institutes active board members, it is difficult to schedule monthly board meetings. However, The Food Addiciton Institute has implemented an FAI "Working Group" that meets monthly to continue the work of the organization. 
Governance Comments by Foundation The board attendance rate of 100% reflects one board meeting in fiscal year 2015.
Fiscal Year Projections
Fiscal Year Begins 2016
Fiscal Year Ends 2016
Projected Revenue $50,000.00
Projected Expenses $45,000.00
Organization has Endowment No
Capital Campaign
In a Capital Campaign No
Campaign Purpose
Campaign Goal
Campaign Dates 0 to 0
Amount Raised To Date 0 as of 0
IRS Form 990s
Historical Financial Review
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201520142013
Program Expense$2,509$5,386$227
Administration Expense$4,307$4,446$1,287
Fundraising Expense$0$0$0
Payments to Affiliates$0$0$0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.202.281.84
Program Expense/Total Expenses37%55%15%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue0%0%0%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Assets$0$0--
Current Assets$0$0--
Long-Term Liabilities$0$0--
Current Liabilities$0$0--
Total Net Assets$0$0--
Top Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201520142013
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountContributions, gifts, grants $1,309Contributions, gifts, grants $21,147 --
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountOther Income $39Foundation & Corporate Support $1,316 --
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount0 $00 $0 --
CEO/Executive Director Compensation
Tax Credits No
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities------
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets------
Financials Comments
Financial Comments by Organization
 
Financial Comments by Foundation According to GuideStar, the organization files a 990N.  Financial information provided based on unaudited P/L statements submitted by the organization. Organization did not provide a balance sheet.
Nonprofit The Food Addiction Institute Inc
Address 1368 Georgetowne Circle
SARASOTA , FL 34232 0331
Phone 941 223-0081

THE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION OF SARASOTA COUNTY, INC. IS A REGISTERED 501(C)(3) NON-PROFIT CORPORATION. A COPY OF THE OFFICIAL REGISTRATION AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE DIVISION OF CONSUMER SERVICES BY CALLING TOLL-FREE WITHIN THE STATE (1-800-HELP-FLA) OR FROM THE WEBSITE: WWW.FRESHFROMFLORIDA.COM. REGISTRATION DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT, APPROVAL, OR RECOMMENDATION BY THE STATE. ONE HUNDRED PERCENT (100%) OF EACH CONTRIBUTION IS RECEIVED BY THE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION OF SARASOTA COUNTY. REGISTRATION #SC-02471.