United Community Centers
PO Box 1683
922 24th Street East
Bradenton FL 34206
Mission
The mission of UCC is “Building Dreams…Changing Lives”, by  providing positive, productive environments filled with educational, cultural, recreational, and social opportunities to individual youth, their families, and the entire community, in a safe and supportive setting while maximazing their individual potential.

On an annual basis, 1500 at risk youth and their families take advantage of the age- appropriate, developmental programs offered by United Community Centers. The agency’s ultimate goal is to lay foundations for positive academic,social, cultural and recreational skill-building and attainment in hopes that the youth retain those skills as they enter into adulthood. 

Many of the neighborhoods that the youth and families call home, have an overwhelming presence of negative influences such as illiteracy, poverty, substance abuse, low self-esteem, low neighborhood attachment and and high instances of population transition and mobility. The negative influences of these neighborhoods that impact the youth and families that reside within, are countered through UCC’s community based programming, which is designed to offset the negatives with positive alternatives, because oftentimes these negative influneces create an environment that is exceedingly difficult for youth to emerge from successfully. 

UCC is a resource located within the county's highest-risk communities and is committed to providing External Assets  of :
1) Support
2) Empowerment 
3) Boundaries and Expectations
 
UCC also assists youth in developing Internal Assests of :
1) Commitment to Learning
 2) Positive Values
 3) Social Competencies and
4) Postive Identity, as they develop into positive adults.  
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Mr. Patrick J. Carnegie
Board Chair Ms. Lillan Elliot
Board Chair Affiliation PepsiCo/Tropicana Products, Inc
General Info
Organization DBA
DBA
13th AV Dream Center
Manatee Mustangs
Supported Organization
Former Names
Tax Exempt Status Public Supported Charity
Incorporation Year 1992
Awarded competitive grant from Community Foundation in the last 5 years?
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes July 2016
State Registration Yes 0
IRS Letter of Determination
View
Financial Summary
 
 
Projected Revenue $992,678.00
Projected Expenses $988,601.00
Other Documents
Impact Statement
Accomplishments 2013-2014:
Expanded K-2 Leveled Literacy Reading Program to
include 3rd grade and increased clients served by 30 for a total of 90 students.

Increased Volunteer participation in the "Reading
Buddies" program in support of the increase in students served in Leveled Literacy Reading Program.

85.71 % of students in the Leveled Literacy Reading Recovery Program  increased skills in reading and literacy as measured by the end of program assessments and monthly fluency test. 
84.37% of youth enrolled in the Before and After School programs increased knowledge and skills in the area of Good Decision Making to include 1) Personal Responsibility orf making safe and healthy choices 2) Importance of stopping and thinking before deciding and 3) Steps in the decision making process model.
 
Goals 2014-2015:
**Expand After School Tutoring Program
 
** Complete Charter School Appilication for submission in 2015 for On-site Charter school to serve low performing/at-risk students in grades K-8
 
**Identify new funding sources
 
 
Needs Statement

Increased operational funding for programs and staff development.

New transportation (buses/vans) for before and after school
services

Classroom Furniture (tables and chairs)

Educational Materials (curriculums, software, hardware,
etc.)

Reduction in facility mortgage


Focused Grant writing and fund development
initiative
Background Statement
United Community Centers, Inc. (“UCC”) was the product of a merger in April 2000 of the Rubonia Center and 13th Avenue Dream Center which have served their respective communities for 75 years. Local civil rights activist Minnie Rodgers, famed educator Dr. Mary McCloud Bethune, and former First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, in 1937, created a community cornerstone with the erection of the13thAveCommunity Center. It became a safe haven and recreational, cultural, social and academic outlet to the communities of Central Bradenton.  
Areas Served
Areas Served
Area
FL- Manatee
Service Categories
Primary Org Type Human Services
Secondary Org Type Youth Development
Tertiary Org Type
Keywords
youth and community services; education; literacy; tutoring; athletics; dream center; services for at-risk and ecnomically disadvantaged youth
Statement from the Board Chair/Board President

There can be no more important focus or greater privilege
than ensuring a better future for our children - all of our children. That
belief and the passion and commitment from our CEO, Patrick Carnegie has been the catalyst for my commitment and love for the 13th AV Dream Center and UCC, Inc. I am humbled by the opportunity to support the mission of ourDreamCenterand energized toknow everything good and right will come from ensuring our current programs remain vital. As Board Chair, my commitment is to assist Patrick and the Board of Directors to achieve our next goals - an expanded debt free Center whereby along with sports, fitness,academic, prevention and empowerment programs, we can provide a safe and holistic environment to ensure a child can achieveallof their Dreams. This will include the addition of music, performing arts and an expanded literacy curriculum.

Our objective is to achieve a stronger attachment and investment from the community to theDream Center with the central message of
"what is good for theDream Center is good for our Community" - we know enriching the children with social values, literacy and educational support enriches the Community as a whole.

Outreach programs are critical to ensuring theDreamCenter's ongoing success. Investing our Community at large and sourcing and nurturing partnerships are vital to the financial well-being of the Center. Achieving our outreach objectives requires our CEO to focus much more time on working with the Board of Directors on critical funding initiatives - ensuring we have best in class educational and social programsfor the Center. Currently our CEO wears
most every hat including daily operations, fund-raising, program development,
facilities oversight, grant writing, partnership development, and interfacing
with city, county and federal administrators. Positions such as Program Development Director and Community Outreach are imperative to position the Dream Center to ascent to a more critical level of support for the Community it serves, allowing our CEO to act more strategically on behalf of our children's needs.

The capital funds raised thus far has allowed us to recreate the Center to be more central to the surrounding community, building a sense of community pride and engaging the families and children. But there is an urgent need to retire the debt with additional capital funding, with an eye to future expansion as the Center grows. Currently we are outgrowing the existing classroom space.
The heritage of the 13th AV Dream Center is a story unto itself. This year we will achieve our 75th Anniversary, having been founded in 1937 by then local community activist Minnie Rogers with help from Dr. Mary McLeod Bethune and First Lady, Eleanor Roosevelt. Today their Dream lives on through the commitment and support of people who believe as Dr. Bethune said -"Invest
in the human soul. Who knows, it might be a diamond in the rough."


Every day Patrick and his team at theDreamCenter work diligently to deliver this message of hope and opportunity to the children who attend the 13th Av Dream Center. 

Sincerely,

Rebecca Kreitsek
 
Chair, Board of Directors
Statement from the CEO/Executive Director

United Community Centers means much more than a job to me;
it’s a mission. I attended the nursery school as a young child and grew up in the Before School, After School and Summer Programs. As a youth, I worked as a mentor and coached sports teams for many years. Returning 18 years ago as CEO,felt more like coming home than starting a new job. I feel privileged to be here to watch so many generations of kids grow up.

We’re a small organization but we do things on a big level. We’ve always been that corner stone that helps people wherever they are. Our family atmosphere, rich history and team sports draw children to the Center where they are enticed to try other programs, such as Peer Empowerment, Reading Buddies, Building Alternatives to Drugs. If their families need help, we reach out to other services and make sure that need is filled, whether it is money for food, help with job hunting, parenting classes, or access to mental health services.

Sometimes UCC becomes a refuge. A 13 year old boy who was being raised by his grandmother became homeless when she died. UCC Staff made sure that he ate, had decent clothes to wear and ultimately that he was placed with friends of the family. After some turbulent years, he was awarded a full scholarship to Florida State University where he played football.

Over the years, the Center has come to mean so much to so many different people. However, the population we serve can’t afford to pay a lot for services – 93 percent of the youth who attend UCC programs have an average family income of less than 150 percent of the Federal
Poverty Guidelines. This makes writing grants and fund raising a priority. In the past few years, we’ve begun a Capital Campaign to help us build even better services.  

We tell children if you dream it, you can achieve it. But if somewhere along the way, those dreams die, we’re here to find the resources to keep the children motivated and to keep their dreams alive.

Programs
Description

Peer Empowerment Program

This is a comprehensive prevention and intervention program designed for at-risk youth ages 9-17 to confront and develop alternatives to negative issues facing them every day. Peer Empowerment is broken down into four sessions, each three months in duration. It addresses:

(1) Teen pregnancy prevention

(2) Crime prevention

(3) Self-esteem, social etiquette, good decision making skills and

(4) Career development and entrepreneurship

 

Youth participate three times each week by attending classes, workshops, lectures by guest speakers and field trips. The program helps youth overcome the negative obstacles in their lives by utilizing the knowledge and skills they have developed. The goal is for them to develop a sense of achievement through positive reinforcement so they can become contributing members of their communities.

 

Budget $48,000
Category Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Program Linked to Organizational Strategy Yes
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years) At-Risk Populations Blacks, African Heritage
Short Term Success
Youth will complete community service projects and hold memberships and office in civic, faith-based and community organizations.
Long Term Success
75% of youth will show an increase in positive pro-social behavior and leadership skill development..
Program Success Monitoring
Program is monitored by case notes, observation forms, subjective assessments and participants records.
Program Success Examples
During the last program year:
91% of the program participants increased positive pro-social and leadership skills through community service projects and civic group involvement.
100% of the program participants demonstrated postive resistance skills to substance abuse and peer pressure.
Description

Performing Arts and Physical Education

Performing Arts

Each child has the potential to succeed and will be encouraged and challenged to exceed. The mission of the Performing Arts Academy is to give each child a positive experience and exposure in the performing arts and to creatively assist in fostering a better image. The Arts creates Character. Classes are offered in Band, Choir, Drama and Piano as well as Intro to the Arts and Music Theory and Performance Tech. These classes and sessions provide a platform for the young artists to showcase talents at local community events including but not limited to talent shows performances and art displays.

Physical Education

This component has structured team sports programs in Pop Warner-Football and Cheerleading, Amateur Athletic Union-Track and Field, Youth Basketball of America-Basketball, and MLB’s Revitalizing Baseball in the Inner-City-Baseball. These programs, at a minimum, practice three to four times per week and compete in games, meets or competitions on a weekly basis. Wellness sessions are conducted weekly using the research based curriculum on Nutrition and Exercise.

 

Budget $33,000
Category Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Program Linked to Organizational Strategy Yes
Population Served Families At-Risk Populations Blacks, African Heritage
Short Term Success
Youth will have increased test scores and reduced overall BMI.
Long Term Success
Seventy-five percent of youth involved in this program will increase knowledge of health and physical fitness ideals and principles.
Program Success Monitoring
Program success is monitored by pre and post tests of both knowledge and BMI.
Program Success Examples
During the last program year:
89% of the program participants increased knowledge of health and physical fitness ideals and principles.
 
Description
This substance abuse prevention program component's purpose is to educate youth ages 5-8 and their families over a ten week course that covers such topics as:
1. Self-Awareness
2. Healthy Lifestyles
3. Decision Making
4. Peer Pressure
5. Goal Setting
6. Medications and
7. Gateway Drugs such as alscohol, tobacco, and marijuana
Prevention specialists provide facts and negative effects of drug use and offer alternatives using the Mendez Foundations curriculum as well as Yuth Crime Watch of America and the National Institute on Drug Abuse. The program is supplemented with community resources and parental involvement whenever available.
Budget $28,000
Category Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Program Linked to Organizational Strategy Yes
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years) At-Risk Populations Blacks, African Heritage
Short Term Success
85% of youth will increase resistance skills to substance abuse and peer pressure.
Long Term Success
85% of  youth will show an increase in knowledge regarding substance abuse and its prevention.
Program Success Monitoring
Pre and Post testing
Program Success Examples
During the last program year:
 
93% of the program participants increased knowledge regarding substance abuse and and its prevention.
 
100% of the program participants demonstrated positive resistance skills to substance abuse and peer pressure.
 
 
Description

Before/After School Summer Enrichment Program

Before School: Youth participate in educational and cognitive activities: table games, puzzles, word searches, chess club, book club, yoga and are bussed to their respective school locations. After School: Children ages 5-14 participate in recreational & educational activities. Recreation activities: Arts & Crafts, Scouting, Culinary Arts, Team & Individual Sports, Technology. Through colloborations, UCC offers sports camps, field trips & cultural experiences.  Facilitated by certified educators, Homework Assistance, and Tutoring participants receive individual & group remediation in specific subject areas using one on one tutoring, computer-based lessons & tutorials.Summer Camps: are similar to the after school schedule,but on an extended day. Unique and fun focused themed camp activities are offered and cover a range of topics from Mad Science, Space Exploration, CSI- Forensics, The World Underground and many more.

 

 

 

Budget $225,000
Category Youth Development, General/Other Youth Development, General/Other
Program Linked to Organizational Strategy Yes
Population Served K-12 (5-19 years) At-Risk Populations Blacks, African Heritage
Short Term Success
75% of youth enrolled in this program will show an increase in positive pro-social norms (rules of behavior).
Long Term Success
75 % of youth enrolled in Education Component/Tutoring will improve academic performance to include an increase in overall Grade Point Average or increased letter grade in a specific subject within a 10 week period.
Program Success Monitoring
Review of official report card or progress report from private or public school that student attends.
Program Success Examples
Increase in program participation and a decrease in discipline referrals and in program and school suspensions.
Description
To promote and foster good academic futures, UCC’s Balanced Literacy and Reading Recovery Program is designed to reduce the number of students in Kindergarten through Second Grade who have extreme difficulty learning to read and write, and by targeting these grades will lessen the liklihood of unsuccessful academic experiences in subsequent grades. The program is a highly effective intervention of small group tutoring for low achieving Kindergarteners, 1stGraders and 2ndGraders. The intervention is most effective when it is available to all students who need it and is used as a supplement to good classroom teaching.

Individual students receive a 1.5 hour session 2 times per week from a State Certified teacher and 2 early childhood development assistants . As soon as the students can meet grade-level expectations and demonstrate that they can continue to work independently in the classroom , they are moved to another leveled reading group.

Budget $68,000
Category Education, General/Other Literacy
Program Linked to Organizational Strategy Yes
Population Served K-12 (5-19 years) At-Risk Populations General/Unspecified
Short Term Success
85% of students will increase their DRA reading levels by 5 or more levels by the conclusion of the 30 week progam.
Long Term Success
75% of students who are reading on grade level at the completion of the 2 year program will achieve academic success in subsequent years.
Program Success Monitoring
Through pre, mid-range and post DRA assessments
Program Success Examples

UCC has been successfully providing this program since the 2008-2009
school year boasts a more than an 90% success rate and an average enrollment increase of 65% annually for the past 4 years.


Comments
Program Comments by Organization
United Community Centers’ location and clientele pose both challenges and opportunities. UCC’s biggest challenge over the years has been to continue to offer high quality programs and services and to maintain an attractive building. The target zone that UCC serves has high
concentrations of African Americans and Hispanics who are more susceptible to poverty, illiteracy, crime and substance abuse.Ninety-three percent of the youth who attend our programs have an average family
income of less than 150% of the Federal Poverty Guidelines.

Because our clientele can’t afford to pay much for services, we need to spend a lot of time raising funds through grants, fundraising activities and a capital campaign. In 2010, we built the Dream Center in Bradenton, the nucleus for all our programs. But we also took on a large debt that could be reduced more quickly with unrestricted funding. Our staff, including the CEO and Operations Manager, must wear many
hats. The addition of a program director and possibly a fund development specialist would mean having someone on staff to spend all his or her time addressing these issues. It would also free the CEO and Operations Manager to address other urgent needs such as developing relationships, finding new partners, and attending to administrative issues.

But the opportunities far exceed the challenges. The number of children and youths playing on the athletic teams, attending programs or receiving services at UCC now exceeds 1700. This number continues to grow which means we are reaching more families and have more
opportunities to help more children develop resiliency and external assets including positive values, positive identities, social competencies and a commitment to learning. Our employees are highly trained educators and staff members who are committed to UCC, its mission and, especially, to the children. Like myself, some have grown up in the surrounding neighborhoods and at the Center. Through its 75 plus years of serving the community, UCC has continued to meet its challenges and remains committed to helping children keep their dreams alive.

Program Comments by Foundation
CEO/Executive Director
CEO/Executive Director Mr. Patrick J. Carnegie
CEO Term Start 1994
CEO/Executive Director Email pcarnegie@uccfl.org
Experience
A dynamic leader who has worked his entire 19 year career in non-profit administration related to human services,  Patrick Carnegie has  experience in program development, staff management, financial systems, major special events coordination, public relations, and inspiring community involvement. In addition, he has skills in marketing, relationship building, strategic planning, board development, personnel supervision,  budget management, capital campaign leadership, donor recognition, and public speaking.

At UCC, Patrick serves as chief executive, administrator and professional advisor to the board of directors. He recommends appropriate policies for consideration and effectively implements all policies adopted by the board; informs and interprets for the board all program operations; policy, develops a budget, employs, dismisses and evaluates personnel in accordance with agency policy. 
Former CEOs/Executive Directors
NameTerm
Senior Staff
NameTitle
Ms. Alexdrena Green Director of Operations
Mr. Steve Wicker CFO
Staff & Volunteer Statistics
Full Time Staff 7
Part Time Staff 11
Staff Retention Rate % 71
Professional Development Yes
Contractors 6
Volunteers 200
Management Reports to Board Yes
CEO/Executive Director Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non-Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Collaborations
UCC's collaborative partners include:
Manatee County YMCA
Just for Girls, Inc
Christ Church of Longboat Key
GD Rogers Elementary School
Manatee Elementary School
Pirate City/ Pirates Charities
Bradenton Mauraders
Unidos Now
Champs Sports
Affiliations
AffiliationYear
External Assessments and Accreditations
Assessment/AccreditationYear
Awards & Recognition
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Risk Management Provisions
Automobile Insurance
Commercial General Liability
Improper Sexual Conduct/Sexual Abuse
Special Event Liability
Government Licenses
Organization Licensed by the Government
Plans
Fundraising Plan No
Communication Plan No
Strategic Plan No
Strategic Plan Years N/A
Strategic Plan Adopted 0
Management Succession Plan No
Policies and Procedures Yes
Continuity of Operations Plan Yes
Policies
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy No
Comments
Management Comments by Organization
United Community Centers’ location and clientele pose both challenges and opportunities. UCC’s biggest challenge over the years has been to continue to offer high quality programs and services and to maintain an attractive building. The target zone that UCC serves has high
concentrations of African Americans and Hispanics who are more susceptible to poverty, illiteracy, crime and substance abuse.Ninety-three percent of the youth who attend our programs have an average family
income of less than 150% of the Federal Poverty Guidelines.

Because our clientele can’t afford to pay much for services, we need to spend a lot of time raising funds through grants, fundraising activities and a capital campaign. In 2010, we built the DreamCenter in Bradenton,
the nucleus for all our programs. But we also took on a large debt that could be reduced more quickly with unrestricted funding. Our staff, including the CEO and Operations Manager, must wear many
hats. The addition of a program director and possibly a fund development
specialist would mean having someone on staff to spend all his or her time addressing these issues. It would also free the CEO and Operations Manager to address other urgent needs such as developing relationships, finding new partners, and attending to administrative issues.

But the opportunities far exceed the challenges. The number of children and youths playing on the athletic teams, attending programs or receiving services at UCC now exceeds 1700. This number continues to grow which means we are reaching more families and have more
opportunities to help more children develop resiliency and external assets
including positive values, positive identities, social competencies and a
commitment to learning. Our employees are highly trained educators and staff members who are committed to UCC, its mission and, especially, to the children. Like myself, some have grown up in the surrounding neighborhoods and at the Center. Through its 75 years of serving the community, UCC has continued to meet its challenges and remains committed to helping children keep their dreams alive.

Management Comments by Foundation
Board Chair
Board Chair Ms. Lillan Elliot
Company Affiliation PepsiCo/Tropicana Products, Inc
Board Term Aug 2013 to Dec 2016
Board Chair Email Lillian.J.Elliott@pepsico.com
Board Members
Board Members
NameAffiliation
Mrs Elouise Bacon Retired
Mrs. Syliva Camerena Manatee County Rural Health Services
Mr. Patrick Carnegie United Community Centers, Inc.
Mr. Bob Delaney Community Volunteer
Mrs. Billie Delaney Community Volunteer
Mr. Bob Dods Community Volunteer
Ms. Lillian Elliot Tropicana
Mr. Dennis Frey Business Owner- Manatee Apparel Graphics
Mr. Michael Gardiner Retired/VP Marketing
Mr. James Gordon Sr.Business Owner- Gordon's Garage
Mr. Bill Grimsley Wal-Mart
Mr. Robert Hierak Community Volunteer
Mrs. Rebecca Krietsek Champs Sports
Mrs. Dorothy Middleton Retired
Lt. John Murrell Manatee County Sherriff- Law Enforcement
Rev. Frank Peterman Jr.Community Volunteer
Pastor James Roberts St. Paul Missionary Baptist Church- Pastor
Student serving on the board through Community Youth Development?
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 9
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 7
Hispanic/Latino 1
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 11
Female 6
Unspecified 0
Governance
Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Board Orientation Yes
Number of Full Board Meetings Annually 12
Board Meeting Attendance % 93
Board Self-Evaluation Yes
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict of Interest Policy Yes
% of Board Making Monetary Contributions 100
% of Board Making In-Kind Contributions 100
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes
Standing Committees
Executive
Nominating
Finance
Human Resources / Personnel
Comments
Governance Comments by Organization
United Community Centers’ location and clientele pose both challenges and opportunities. UCC’s biggest challenge over the years has been to continue to offer high quality programs and services and to maintain an attractive building. The target zone that UCC serves has high
concentrations of African Americans and Hispanics who are more susceptible to poverty, illiteracy, crime and substance abuse.Ninety-three percent of the youth who attend our programs have an average family
income of less than 150% of the Federal Poverty Guidelines.

 Because our clientele can’t afford to pay much for services, we need to spend a lot of time raising funds through grants, fundraising activities and a capital campaign. In 2010, we built the Dream Center in Bradenton,
the nucleus for all our programs. But we also took on a large debt that could be reduced more quickly with unrestricted funding. Our staff, including the CEO and Operations Manager, must wear many
hats. The addition of a program director and possibly a fund development
specialist would mean having someone on staff to spend all his or her time addressing these issues. It would also free the CEO and Operations Manager to address other urgent needs such as developing relationships, finding new partners, and attending to administrative issues. 

But the opportunities far exceed the challenges. The number of children and youths playing on the athletic teams, attending programs or receiving services at UCC now exceeds 1700. This number continues to grow which means we are reaching more families and have more
opportunities to help more children develop resiliency and external assets
including positive values, positive identities, social competencies and a
commitment to learning. Our employees are highly trained educators and staff members who are committed to UCC, its mission and, especially, to the children. Like myself, some have grown up in the surrounding neighborhoods and at the Center. Through its 75 years of serving the community, UCC has continued to meet its challenges and remains committed to helping children keep their dreams alive.

Governance Comments by Foundation
Fiscal Year Projections
Fiscal Year Begins 2014
Fiscal Year Ends 2015
Projected Revenue $992,678.00
Projected Expenses $988,601.00
Endowment Value
Endowment Spending Policy
Endowment Spending Policy %
Capital Campaign
In a Capital Campaign No
Campaign Purpose
Campaign Goal
Campaign Dates 0 to 0
Amount Raised To Date 0 as of 0
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes
Historical Financial Review
Revenue SourcesHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201420132012
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$0$0$0
Government Contributions$258,121$273,758$299,805
Federal$0$0$0
State$0$0$0
Local$0$273,758$0
Unspecified$258,121$0$299,805
Individual Contributions$427,790$217,971$101,994
$0$0$47,623
$186,969$228,616$125,046
Investment Income, Net of Losses$13$1,309$0
Membership Dues$0$0$0
Special Events$20,949$75,823$189,897
Revenue In-Kind$0$0$0
Other$0$0$0
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201420132012
Program Expense$676,381$801,086$667,494
Administration Expense$110,159$91,823$190,437
Fundraising Expense$0$0$0
Payments to Affiliates$0$0$0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.141.990.89
Program Expense/Total Expenses86%200%78%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue0%0%0%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201420132012
Total Assets$2,468,375$2,603,036$2,724,134
Current Assets$56,838$101,527$143,922
Long-Term Liabilities$544,181$768,977$771,905
Current Liabilities$85,883$157,299$159,244
Total Net Assets$1,838,311$1,676,760$1,792,985
Top Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201420132012
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountContributions, gifts, grants $427,790Government Grants - Local $273,971Government Grants $299,805
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountGovertnment Grants - Unspecified $258,121Contributions, gifts, grants $217,971Fundraising $189,897
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountNet Rental Income $116,680Net Rental Income $143,600Contributions, gifts, grants $101,994
CEO/Executive Director Compensation $50,001 - $75,000
Co-CEO/Executive Director Compensation
Tax Credits Yes
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201420132012
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities0.660.650.90
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201420132012
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets22%30%28%
Financials Comments
Financial Comments by Organization
Financial Comments by Foundation Foundations and corporations are included with individual contributions as they are not separated in the IRS Form 990s.  Financial figures were taken from the 990s.  Total revenue reported in audits for FY 2011, 2010 and 2009 was $826,312, $2,728,352, and $884,036 respectively.
Nonprofit United Community Centers
Address PO Box 1683
922 24th Street East
Bradenton, FL 34206
Primary Phone 941 746-7470 227

THE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION OF SARASOTA COUNTY, INC. IS A REGISTERED 501(C)(3) NON-PROFIT CORPORATION. A COPY OF THE OFFICIAL REGISTRATION AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE DIVISION OF CONSUMER SERVICES BY CALLING TOLL-FREE WITHIN THE STATE (1-800-HELP-FLA) OR FROM THE WEBSITE: WWW.FRESHFROMFLORIDA.COM. REGISTRATION DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT, APPROVAL, OR RECOMMENDATION BY THE STATE. ONE HUNDRED PERCENT (100%) OF EACH CONTRIBUTION IS RECEIVED BY THE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION OF SARASOTA COUNTY. REGISTRATION #SC-02471.