Hope Family Services, Inc.
PO Box 1624
Bradenton FL 34206-1624
Mission
The mission of HOPE Family Services (HOPE) is to promote safety, strength and well-being for victims of domestic violence and their children in Manatee County (Florida) regardless of race, sex, age, disability, ethnicity, national origin, language spoken, religious preference, political belief, immigration status or sexual orientation.
All HOPE’s services are offered confidentially and at no cost to a victim or survivor of intimate partner violence to include: 24 hour helpline, emergency safe shelter, advocacy, individualized safety planning, assistance with civil orders for protection, court escorts, case/service management and supportive counseling for adults and children (individual/group).
 
The vision of HOPE is to ensure through services and social change every person in Manatee County has the skills and information necessary to solve problems in a non-violent manner, thus eliminating domestic violence.

 

Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Laurel A. Lynch
Board Chair Ms. Judy Smith
Board Chair Affiliation ONEBLOOD.Inc
General Info
Organization DBA
DBA
Supported Organization
Former Names
HOPE of Manatee
Tax Exempt Status Public Supported Charity
Incorporation Year 1981
Awarded competitive grant from Community Foundation in the last 5 years? Yes
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes May 2015
State Registration Yes Apr 2019
IRS Letter of Determination
View
Financial Summary
 
 
Projected Revenue $1,543,580.00
Projected Expenses $1,543,580.00
Impact Statement

HOPE’s top accomplishment is continuing to expand services to the rural, farm working communities of Manatee County. In addition to two bilingual and bicultural advocates, who focus on safety for women who are isolated and alone in the farmworking ‘camps’ and ensure they receive information on safety planning, the impact of domestic violence on children and how to access services at HOPE, we now also have an advocate dedicated to community organizing.

 

The goals for the new year include overcoming barriers to helping migrant women in the farm worker program by adding a community organizing component.

 
The Board goal for this year is to continue working with the staff members to complete a new strategic plan that includes a communications/marketing component and fundraising plan.
 
 
Needs Statement

In Manatee County, there were 2,623 domestic violence calls for help to law enforcement last year. When you support HOPE, you not only provide victims and their children with emergency safe shelter but with a restful night’s sleep, food, comfort, and safety planning services to build a new life free from harm. Please join us in saving lives!

$10, $25, or $50 gifts cards for items like gas cards, grocery store gift cards, bus passes, prepaid phone cards, automotive store gift certificates, and tire/battery gift certificates. These gift cards are of high priority because they are crucial to a victim trying to get to work, take the children to school or relocate for safety. (ie. Publix, Walmart, Target gift cards)

$75   will provide bed linens, pillows and bath towels for a family in shelter

$100 will provide a night of shelter for a family of four

$125 will provide counseling for a victim and his/her children for a month

$200 will provide toiletries/personal items for HOPE’s Emergency Safe Shelter residents for a month

$500 will feed the residents and their children of HOPE’s Emergency Safe Shelter for a week.



 

Background Statement
HOPE was founded in 1979 by two dedicated advocates. The shelter began in one of the women's homes and through their tireless efforts, they opened the first shelter facility. Within a year they found grants to pay off the mortgage, and HOPE was firmly established as the County’s only family violence safe shelter. The addition of a 24-hour helpline enabled HOPE to become immediately accessible to victims around the clock. 
 
In 1980, HOPE’s services became “certified” -a designation still held today. In 1986, HOPE added children’s services including parenting support, and established the first outreach office. In 1988, the Junior League organized the renovation of the shelter.
 
In 1990, the Board of Directors voted to change the name of the organization from HOPE of Manatee to HOPE Family Services as increasingly, HOPE staff members were working with children thanks to the addition of a children’s therapeutic playroom. In March of 1997 the Board of Directors oversaw the purchase of a permanent Outreach Office downtown.
 
Thanks to the generosity of the Junior League (again), HOPE beautifully renovated the offices to better serve clients who receive help at the downtown location. In addition (a few short months later), the thrift store, The HOPE Chest,was added. In 1999, HOPE added transitional housing for the clients struggling to become self sufficient. The increase in services necessitated another victim advocate to oversee the program that includes rental payments which can last up to six months for a client who qualifies for our help. 
 
Finally, thanks to a very generous bequest, in concert with a million dollar grant capital improvement grant from (then) Governor Jeb Bush, HOPE built a state of the art facility to better serve Manatee County’s battered individuals and their children. 
 
Current initiatives include classes for those interested in Economic Justice, a Farmworker Outreach Program which puts rural farmworking women directly in touch with bicultural and bilingual advocates and Primary Prevention activities to help young men and women from becoming victims or perpetrators in the first place.

Thanks to the staff, the Board and Manatee County residents for their dedication and support — HOPE is a cutting edge domestic violence agency.

 

Areas Served
Areas Served
Area
FL- Manatee
Service Categories
Primary Org Type Human Services
Secondary Org Type
Tertiary Org Type
Keywords
HOPE House, HOPE of Manatee, Black and White
Statement from the Board Chair/Board President
At a time when everyone is affected in some way by the economic recession, families living at the threshold of poverty are apt to feel the effects even more, and financial stress often becomes a precipitating factor in domestic violence. HOPE’s counseling services and the Emergency Safe Shelter become even more critical resources for women and children at a time like this. According to  The National Network to End Domestic Violence, domestic violence is more than three times as likely to occur when couples are experiencing high levels of financial strain as when they are experiencing low levels of financial strain. Women whose male partners experienced two or more periods of unemployment over a 5-year study were almost three times as likely to be victims of intimate violence as were women whose partners were in stable jobs.  Nationally, three out of four domestic violence shelters report an increase in women seeking assistance from abuse since September 2008.

HOPE completed a new facility to address the needs of HOPE’s most vulnerable clients, Manatee County's women and children who are the victims of domestic violence. HOPE desperately needed a new facility to help save lives. Calling other centers to determine if bed space is available, suggesting short term solutions such as friends, a motel or worse, leaving a caller feeling rejected and feeling she was turned away, had become common place for the staff members who answer the 24 hour Helpline.
 
The facility is an 18,601 square foot state-of-the-art facility at which HOPE co-located all services to ensure safety for those who turn to HOPE for help. We are also saving operational expenses and being more efficient by providing services at one location. We anticipated having enough ‘bed space’ for at least 10 years; alas, we’ve been at capacity almost since the day we opened.
 
Regardless of the economic struggles, I am proud to be the Board Chair and to offer my leadership skills to an organization that works tirelessly to help those whose very safety is at risk.
Statement from the CEO/Executive Director
Because of you there is HOPE
Victims and survivors of domestic violence, mostly women and children, need and deserve a safe and secure environment when their home is not a safe place. HOPE Family Services (HOPE), a nonprofit organization, offers that safe place in Manatee County 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.
 
HOPE provides confidential comprehensive programs and services at no cost to participants, all designed to promote safety, strength and well being - - life saving services like emergency safe shelter, counseling, safety planning, danger assessments, and more. 
 
These programs demonstrate an increased survival rate for those who come to HOPE for help. In Florida, 95% of those murdered at the hands of an intimate partner never made the call - a call that might have saved their lives. Therefore victims of domestic violence need help, they need HOPE, if they are going to survive.
 
Those affected by domestic violence depend on you to save their lives. Thanks to the generosity of our community, HOPE’s life-saving services for victims and survivors of domestic violence will continue.
 
On behalf of those HOPE serves … Thank You
Programs
Description  The target population for HOPE’s Emergency Safe Shelter is Manatee County adult victims of domestic violence and their minor/dependent children who have no other safe place to relocate while deciding their best course of action. HOPE’s Safe Shelter helps both men and women who report being a victim of domestic violence without regard to the age, ethnicity, disability, sexual orientation, or religious belief. HOPE anticipates serving approximately 400 unduplicated clients (women and children) at the Safe Shelter next year. The population served is Manatee County residents; however, when space permits, HOPE assists the other domestic violence program clients who must relocate due to safety concerns. 
Budget $462,791
Category Human Services, General/Other Residential Care
Program Linked to Organizational Strategy Yes
Population Served Adults Homeless
Short Term Success  

95% of residents in HOPE's Emergency Safe Shelter will complete a safety plan and will learn individualized safety strategies.

95% of residents in HOPE's Emergency Safe Shelter will develop an individualized action plan with a shelter staff member.

Long Term Success  

The key area HOPE looks for improvement in, is the understanding of the domestic violence dynamics and the necessary steps to protect themselves and their children from additional harm.  The time line is the length of the shelter stay, which can be as long as six weeks. The theory behind the chosen outcomes is: If we can increase the knowledge clients have regarding the dynamics of domestic violence and teach them strategies for keeping themselves safe, then they will be able to choose a violence free lifestyle for themselves and their children.

Program Success Monitoring
Evaluations are conducted by HOPE's Emergency Safe Shelter staff members who work directly with the residents. The Shelter Manager collects the results and monitors the outcomes to ensure safety plans and action plans are completed with the residents receiving services. The results are used to improve services offered to shelter residents. The management team also analyzes the results as they have the authority to make changes based upon the resident's needs and the input of the shelter staff members. 
Program Success Examples Last fiscal year, 100% of the residents in HOPE's Emergency Safe Shelter 72 hours or more completed a safety plan and learned individualized safety strategies.

Last fiscal year, residents in HOPE's Emergency Safe Shelter 72 hours or more, increased their knowledge in goal setting by completing a written plan of action during their shelter stay.

Description

HOPE’s Children’s Counseling Program has two components, one is  geared toward children (up to 17 years old) who live in (or have lived in) families where family or domestic violence occurs or has been witnessed. The Children’s Counseling Program gives children living with the trauma of domestic violence a safe place to express their feelings while learning new, appropriate skills for living an abuse and violence free life.

 

The Children’s Program also provides prevention services to middle and high school students to not only to recognize the warning signs of family violence, but also how to protect themselves or help a friend in danger, practice healthy boundaries, talk respectfully to their partner, and take responsibility for their behavior. HOPE also conducts trainings to school personnel and community agencies on how to respond to dating violence incidents and how HOPE can help with services for “at risk” students.

Budget $398,374
Category Human Services, General/Other Children & Youth Services
Program Linked to Organizational Strategy Yes
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) K-12 (5-19 years)
Short Term Success  

The outcomes HOPE’s staff measures over the 20 weeks of counseling are:

85% of child victims of domestic violence, who have completed counseling services, will learn skills to help them stay safe and resolve conflict in a safe manner, and

85% of victims of domestic violence, who are parents or caregivers and have completed counseling services in this program, will learn the effects of domestic violence on their children and age-appropriate limit setting skills.

Long Term Success  

HOPE’s staff members measure outcomes from the children and parents who receive services through the Children’s Counseling Program. Our first outcome is designed to measure the improvement in children’s ability to keep themselves safe and not act out in a violent manner as they have been taught at home. Our second outcome dovetails on the first and completes the needed improvement for the family system. The second outcome involves the adult in the family and his or her ability to parent safely, understand the dynamics of domestic violence, and understand the impact to their children. The theory is: If the child learns not to be violent and the parents learn the impact of domestic violence on the child(ren), then we will see both parents and children make better choices, which ultimately will lead to improvement in the future and a decline in the number of families involved in domestic violence situations.

Program Success Monitoring
HOPE uses the Program Outcomes Measurement (POM) system designed by the United Way of America, which is taught to staff members through collaborative United Way/Manatee County Training(s).  

If we have low scoring post tests we work to improve the counseling sessions in an effort to better increase the clients knowledge of the subject. To date, we have improved our techniques and changed modalities in minor ways to increase the scores and learning of our clients. Also, as previously mentioned, the POM information is used to help evaluate the counselors’ skills.

 

Program Success Examples Last year, 93% of the children who completed counseling services in HOPE's Children's Counseling Program learned behaviors to help them stay safe and resolve conflicts in a safe manner.

92% of the parents and caregivers of children who participated and completed counseling services in HOPE's Children's Counseling Program, learned the effects of domestic violence on their children and age-appropriate, supportive, limit setting skills.

Description  The Domestic Violence Counseling Program offers clients individual and group counseling in a safe and supportive environment. Group sessions are offered in the afternoon or evening and include specialized groups for elderly, women of color, Spanish speaking, and same sex clients. Clients are 18 years of age or older and live in Manatee County.

 

Counseling gives victims of domestic violence a safe place to express feelings and helps victims learn to trust their choices as they evaluate their options. The Domestic Violence Counseling Program works to increase a survivor’s self worth in order to help facilitate positive change for a violence and abuse-free future. In addition, Manatee County is a fairly large county and in an effort to reach all of the community members who may need assistance, HOPE has developed a neighborhood initiative by offering counseling services at various locations like the Women’s Resource Center, Manatee Technical Institute and at the Emergency Safe Shelter. 
Budget $81,877
Category Human Services, General/Other Personal Enrichment
Program Linked to Organizational Strategy Yes
Population Served Adults
Short Term Success  The program outcome targets are

75% of the adult victims of domestic violence who complete a minimum of two counseling sessions will learn about the dynamics of domestic violence and/or abuse 

75% of adult victims of domestic violence who complete a minimum of two counseling sessions clients will learn skills to keep themselves and when applicable their children safe.

Long Term Success Domestic violence is about power and control. HOPE’s mission to promote safety, strength, and well being helps a victim take control of her life while evaluating her options. All of HOPE’s services, including the Domestic Violence Counseling Program, tie back to the mission of the organization. The Program particularly ties to the mission, as promoting strength and well being is the cornerstone of service to our clients. 

The key area HOPE looks for improvement is in the understanding of the domestic violence dynamics and the necessary steps to protect themselves and their children from additional harm.  The time line is the first two counseling sessions. The theory behind the chosen outcomes is: If we can increase the knowledge clients have regarding the dynamics of domestic violence and teach them strategies for keeping themselves safe, then they will be able to choose a violence free lifestyle for themselves and their children.

Program Success Monitoring  HOPE’s plan for evaluating the accomplishment of outcome(s) in the Domestic Violence Counseling Program is to measure a clients’ increased knowledge of the dynamics of domestic violence and the degree their knowledge has changed regarding safe choices for themselves and their children.
Program Success Examples 94% of the adult victims of domestic violence who completed a minimum of two counseling sessions learned the dynamics of domestic violence and/or abuse and

91% of the adult victims of domestic violence who completed a minimum of two counseling sessions learned skills to keep themselves (and when applicable their children) safe.

Description

HOPE’s Advocacy Program is front-line, emergency, meaningful assistance designed to keep those who call on us safe from additional harm. HOPE advocates offer clients who don’t need emergency safe shelter an individual appointment within 24 hours.  Advocacy services include case management, which is available to clients including accompanying them through a myriad of services from the Food Stamp Office, the State Attorney’s Office, and Court to attend an Injunction for Protection (restraining order) hearings, criminal proceedings or to receive services from other local agencies. Advocates can also coordinate financial assistance if the client meets HOPE’s criteria.

Budget $315,950
Category Human Services, General/Other Case Management
Program Linked to Organizational Strategy Yes
Population Served Adults
Short Term Success  The program outcome target is

75% of the clients who receive an intake will learn three methods to keep themselves and their children safe and 

75% of clients who receive an intake will learn three agency services offered by HOPE Family Services.

Long Term Success Domestic violence is about power and control. HOPE’s mission to promote safety, strength, and well being helps a victim to take control of her life while evaluating her options. All of HOPE’s services, including the Advocacy Program, tie to the mission of the organization. The Advocacy Program particularly ties to the mission, as promoting strength and well being is the cornerstone of service to our clients.

The key area HOPE looks for improvement is in the understanding of domestic violence dynamics and the necessary steps to protect themselves and their children from additional harm. The theory is the same as in the adult counseling program—that is—If a client understands the dynamics of domestic violence and they know how to make safer choices for themselves and their children, then with practice and support, they will choose a violence-free lifestyle. 

Program Success Monitoring
 HOPE uses the Program Outcomes Measurement system designed by the United Way of America, which was taught to our staff members through collaborative United Way/Manatee County Training(s). The target population is adult victims of domestic violence who receive advocacy services at HOPE Family Services. 

The plan for evaluating accomplishment of outcome(s) in the Advocacy Program is an interview questionnaire that is designed to capture the client’s knowledge of domestic violence and strategies for keeping him/herself safe and available services. The theory is, if a client understands the dynamics of family and domestic violence and strategies for keeping herself safe, then she is more likely to make safe choices for herself and her children. 
Program Success Examples
Last year, 100% of those who completed an advocacy intake learned a minimum of three methods to keep themselves and their children safe (children when applicable).
 
Last year, 100% of those who have completed an advocacy intake were able to demonstrate knowledge of at least three advocate/agency services.
Comments
Program Comments by Organization There are no other certified domestic violence agencies in Manatee County. While the Salvation Army operates a shelter for women and children, it is not specifically designed to be a safe place in terms of security, nor does it have the specialized ancillary support services like counseling and advocacy, that our clients utilize daily. HOPE’s shelter is in an undisclosed location with a 24-hour video surveillance system, panic buttons, etc. HOPE is also certified which means we have met the State of Florida Minimum Standards as delineated by the Florida Coalition Against Domestic Violence. HOPE operates this cornerstone service on a shoestring budget. HOPE offers extra services such as a Spanish Speaking Support group, budgeting classes, career building classes, etc.  Without community support, HOPE’s Emergency Safe Shelter would simply become a place for a bed and a meal and the specialized services that set HOPE apart would decrease or cease to exist. Finally, the Domestic Violence Program Annual Report to the legislature states, “businesses spend 3 – 5 billion dollars primarily though health care costs as a result of domestic violence. Increasingly research also suggests that violence in the home is a catalyst for a vast array of social problems such as substance abuse, juvenile delinquency and other types of violent crime.”
Program Comments by Foundation
CEO/Executive Director
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Laurel A. Lynch
CEO Term Start Nov 1996
CEO/Executive Director Email LaurelLynch@hopefamilyservice.org
Experience Laurel Lynch has been a strong advocate for battered women and their children for 30 years. Laurel started as a volunteer for Safe Place & Rape Crisis Center, Sarasota’s state certified domestic violence center in October of 1985, after a brief marriage to an abusive husband. 

Laurel began her paid position for a domestic violence center in 1986, changing careers when she realized there was no greater challenge than to create social change by building a peaceful community through helping battered women and children feel safe in their homes. 

Laurel also catapulted herself back to school, recognizing that passion alone was not going to be enough for her to do the work that she was determined to do. Today, Laurel [Executive Director/CEO for HOPE Family Services (HOPE) since 1996] holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Psychology and a Master’s in Business Administration. Her dedication to ending domestic violence has garnered her the prestigious Sunshine Lady Award given by Doris Buffett, (Buffett Family Foundation). Laurel serves on the Florida Coalition Against Domestic Violence (FCADV) Board of Directors, the statewide membership organizationthat serves as the professional association for Florida's 42 domestic violence service providers. The mission of the FCADV is to work towards ending violence through public awareness, policy development, and support for Florida's domestic violence centers.

Laurel moved HOPE from a small center, in financial crisis to a stable Manatee County not for profit organization recognized as a leader in providing victim services. Laurel continues to show great concern for individuals who come to HOPE needing guidance while not losing her own boundaries and business acumen in the process. She is gentle in her delivery of information while still able to be direct and make her point. These qualities, in concert with her passion to help victims become survivors make Laurel a tremendous asset to HOPE Family Services and the community.
Former CEOs/Executive Directors
NameTerm
Senior Staff
NameTitle
Ms. Donna Cripe Director of Marketing
Ms. Dawn Davis Director Shelter Services
Ms. Uganda Harris Director Advocacy Services
Ms. Kristina Tincher Director of Counseling
Ms. Charlyn "Char" Young Chief Financial Officer
Staff & Volunteer Statistics
Full Time Staff 21
Part Time Staff 6
Staff Retention Rate % 95
Professional Development Yes
Contractors 0
Volunteers 70
Management Reports to Board Yes
CEO/Executive Director Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non-Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Collaborations
HOPE Family Services’ staff members collaborate with social services agencies in Manatee County to offer the best possible service for victims of domestic violence and their children. HOPE has partnerships and/or formal working agreements with Manatee County Sheriff’s Office, Child Protective Investigation Division, Safe Children’s Coalition, Department of Children & Families, Violence Protection Division, Teen Court of the Clerk of Court, Drug Court, the Early Learning Coalition, Suncoast Partnership to End Homelessness, Whole Child Project, Manatee County School Board, Just for Girls, Family Resources Runaway Shelter, Women’s Resource Center, Healthy Start Manatee, East Coast Migrant Head Start Project (Myakka Center), Tillman Full Service Center in Palmetto, MTI’s Farmworker Program, and Community Center for Deaf & Hard of Hearing, Manatee Glens, and Manatee Community Action Agency.
 
This year HOPE's collaborative efforts have increased.  Formal conversations focused on increasing efficiency and avoiding duplication have taken place with The Woman's Resource Center of Manatee County.  Board Chairs were part of the preliminay conversation and 2013 should bring new, creative collabotive efforts to bear. 
Affiliations
AffiliationYear
External Assessments and Accreditations
Assessment/AccreditationYear
Awards & Recognition
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Sunshine Peace Award to Laurel Lynch, CEOSunshine Lady Foundation2004
Sylvia Tucker Award to Dawn Davis, Shelter ManagerFlorida Coalition Against Domestic Violence2012
Risk Management Provisions
Government Licenses
Organization Licensed by the Government Yes
Plans
Fundraising Plan No
Communication Plan Yes
Strategic Plan No
Strategic Plan Years 3
Strategic Plan Adopted Sept 2014
Management Succession Plan Yes
Policies and Procedures Yes
Continuity of Operations Plan Yes
Policies
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
Comments
Management Comments by Organization

Some policies and procedures were in place when the current Executive Director/CEO started in November of 1996.  Since then, new policies have been added, old policies have been revised and Board policies have been put in place.  The Board, staff, and volunteers view the policies of the organization as a work in progress designed to always offer best practices.

 

 

Management Comments by Foundation
Board Chair
Board Chair Ms. Judy Smith
Company Affiliation ONEBLOOD.Inc
Board Term Jan 2015 to June 2015
Board Chair Email Jsmith@FBSBlood.org
Board Members
Board Members
NameAffiliation
Ms. Twila Averill First Bank
Dr. Lyn Boyer retired
Ms. Rosemarie Fisher retired
Mr. Daniel J. Friedrich IIIBlake Medical Center
Mrs. Mirinda Hill Community Volunteer
Dr. Robert P Hillstrom MD, FACSHillstrom Plastic Surgery
Ms. Carol R. Laudicina Manatee Sheriff's Office
Mrs. Deborah Pickhardt Marriott Hotels
Mr. John Rice none
Mr. Tom Salisbury Manatee County Sheriff's Office
Dr. Judy Smith Florida Blood Services, Inc.
Mr. Jeffrey R. Woodin Fifth Third Bank
Student serving on the board through Community Youth Development? No
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 9
Hispanic/Latino 2
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 5
Female 7
Unspecified 0
Governance
Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits 3
Board Orientation Yes
Number of Full Board Meetings Annually 9
Board Meeting Attendance % 78
Board Self-Evaluation Yes
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict of Interest Policy Yes
% of Board Making Monetary Contributions 100
% of Board Making In-Kind Contributions 0
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes
Standing Committees
Audit
Nominating
By-laws
Special Events (Golf Tournament, Walk / Run, Silent Auction, Dinner / Gala)
Finance
Comments
Governance Comments by Organization
Governance Comments by Foundation
Fiscal Year Projections
Fiscal Year Begins 2014
Fiscal Year Ends 2015
Projected Revenue $1,543,580.00
Projected Expenses $1,543,580.00
Endowment Value $15,230.00
Endowment Spending Policy Income Only
Endowment Spending Policy %
Capital Campaign
In a Capital Campaign No
Campaign Purpose
Campaign Goal
Campaign Dates 0 to 0
Amount Raised To Date 0 as of 0
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No
IRS Form 990s
Audit/Financial Documents
Historical Financial Review
Revenue SourcesHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201420132012
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$108,907$0$0
Government Contributions$1,028,182$1,122,976$1,115,882
Federal$0$0$1,115,882
State$0$0$0
Local$0$0$0
Unspecified$1,028,182$1,122,976$0
Individual Contributions$101,331$83,193$103,147
$87,990$87,990$82,061
$379,580$175,599$134,792
Investment Income, Net of Losses$3,825$1,587$2,520
Membership Dues$0$0$0
Special Events$94,107$58,632$36,345
Revenue In-Kind$59,473$0$210,814
Other$0$0$0
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201420132012
Program Expense$1,587,574$1,448,709$1,422,771
Administration Expense$158,434$148,273$148,182
Fundraising Expense$28,775$1,867$1,810
Payments to Affiliates$0$0$0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.050.960.94
Program Expense/Total Expenses89%91%90%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue2%0%0%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201420132012
Total Assets$5,147,372$5,060,840$5,066,411
Current Assets$1,295,986$1,175,331$1,059,490
Long-Term Liabilities$0$1,000,000$1,000,000
Current Liabilities$1,066,552$68,632$69,950
Total Net Assets$4,080,820$3,992,208$3,996,461
Top Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201420132012
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountGovernment Grants - Unspecified $1,028,182Government Grants - Unspecified $1,122,976Government Grants - Federal $1,115,882
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountHope Chest Thrift Shop $367,580Net Income from Sale of Inventory $163,599Net income from sale of inventory $122,406
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountFoundation & Corporate Support $108,907Federated Campaigns $87,990Contributions, gifts, grants $103,147
CEO/Executive Director Compensation $75,001 - $100,000
Co-CEO/Executive Director Compensation
Tax Credits No
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201420132012
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities1.2217.1315.15
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201420132012
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%20%20%
Financials Comments
Financial Comments by Organization
Financial Comments by Foundation
Financial figures taken from IRS Form 990 and audit documents. 990s and audits reconcile. Individual contributions include foundation and corporate support, as reported on 990s.  Financial information for 2014 was taken solely from the audited financial statements as the Federal tax return was not available at time of review.  The value of in-kind donations is included in income on the audited financial statements.
Nonprofit Hope Family Services, Inc.
Address PO Box 1624
Bradenton, FL 342061624
Primary Phone 941 747-8499

THE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION OF SARASOTA COUNTY, INC. IS A REGISTERED 501(C)(3) NON-PROFIT CORPORATION. A COPY OF THE OFFICIAL REGISTRATION AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE DIVISION OF CONSUMER SERVICES BY CALLING TOLL-FREE WITHIN THE STATE (1-800-HELP-FLA) OR FROM THE WEBSITE: WWW.FRESHFROMFLORIDA.COM. REGISTRATION DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT, APPROVAL, OR RECOMMENDATION BY THE STATE. ONE HUNDRED PERCENT (100%) OF EACH CONTRIBUTION IS RECEIVED BY THE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION OF SARASOTA COUNTY. REGISTRATION #SC-02471.