Lighthouse of Manasota
7318 N Tamiami Trail
Sarasota FL 34243-1401
Transition Students boarding a bus.
Mission
The Lighthouse of Manasota exists to advance the individual growth and independence of adults and children with vision loss.  
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Andy Reeves
Board Chair Mr. Josh D. Kollman President
Board Chair Company Affiliation Northern Trust
History and Background
Organization DBA
DBA
Lighthouse of Manasota
Mana-Sota Lighthouse for the Blind, Inc.
Tax Exempt Status Public Supported Charity
Awarded a competitive grant from Community Foundation in the last 5 years?
Incorporation Year 1985
Financial Summary
 
 
Projected Revenue $1,418,500.00
Projected Expenses $1,418,500.00
State Info
State Charitable Solicitations Permit Yes Aug 2015
State Registration Yes Dec 2014
Statements
Impact

Accomplishments from the past year:

  • The Lighthouse of Manasota served 375 clients last year, with 226 being New clients. We provided 12,621 hours of service.
  • We purchased Online Data Management software from Community Tech Knowledge resulting in streamlined administrative processes which lead to more productive time spent with our clients.
  • We have a new, fully integrated website offering clients and partners a better experience online including secure shopping, donor access to financial statements, and up-to-date information on Lighthouse programs and events.
  • The 19th annual Morrish Memorial Golf Tournament reached it's final goal of raising $1,000,000 over the lifetime of the event.
Goals for the Current Year:
  • Conduct Board development activities to establish standing committees including board resource, program, development and finance committees. Put a strong but thorough recruitment process in place for board growth.  
  • Conduct a strategic planning exercise with the full Board and Lighthouse leadership staff to pave the way for future success. 
  • Implement communications strategies to put the Lighthouse 'top of mind' with current and future supporters.
  • Transition a twelve year old walk event into a community-wide awareness campaign about preventing vision loss and Lighthouse services.
  • Create a new signature event based on Dining in the Dark concept. 
  • Prepare to celebrate our 30th Anniversary in 2015.
 
Background
The Manasota Lighthouse for the Blind was established as a not for profit in 1985 and was run by volunteers until 1988 when the first executive director was hired.  Since its inception, the Lighthouse has provided quality education and specialized services to children and adults with vision loss. The Lighthouse does not charge clients or their families for these services, and does not bill Medicare or private insurance. Lighthouse programs are funded in part by the Florida Department of Education Division of Blind Services, the Manatee Board of County Commissioners, private contributions, bequests and fundraising efforts by the Lighthouse.
Needs
1.New lighting for the Independent Living Classroom. Current florescent lighting is difficult for clients with low vision to see during classes.  Cumulous lighting is desired to help clients have a better experience during their 8 week session.
 
2. Volunteers: for client transport, classroom helpers, special event fund raising, board sub-committees, building and grounds maintenance, client field trips.
Statement from the CEO/Executive Director


Statement from the Board Chair/Board President
The way in which we fulfill our mission each year is truly a love story between the Lighthouse staff and our clients. It is my belief every staff member feels it is their calling to meet the needs of our ever-growing visually impaired community.  No obstacle is too small to ensure that our clients have access to the resources necessary to recapture their independence and confidence. It is the positive spirit of our clients and staff that makes us successful. Since becoming involved with the Lighthouse in 2008, I have met several sighted individuals in our community that have not heard of our organization. So how can a 29-year old organization with so much impact go unnoticed to so many? Good question! Community outreach is certainly on the mind of the organization's leadership and staff as we look forward. Perhaps you would like a tour of the Lighthouse to see for yourself how we change lives?  
Areas Served
Areas Served
Area
In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
FL- Sarasota
FL- Manatee
FL- Charlotte
FL- DeSoto
Service Categories
Primary Org Type Human Services
Programs
Description

Activities of daily living are the primary focus of this program’s rehabilitation teaching. Classes are held at the Lighthouse’s main facility and at satellite facilities. This year 218 adults will be served by the Lighthouse Independent Living Program.

 

The target population for the Independent Living Program includes anyone whose vision loss impacts their daily life. Vision loss may result from accident, eye diseases, secondary illnesses or medical conditions. The client needs instruction on how to adjust to blindness and vision loss. Case Managers at the Lighthouse conduct initial intake interviews with clients and arrange for them to participate in Lighthouse’s free classes in their community.

 

Staff provides caring support following a lesson plan that has been developed over the past 25 years. Vision Rehabilitation Therapists are responsible for curriculum development, coordination and instruction in all classes. Classes run continuously throughout the year, and each cycle is seven to eight weeks long, two days a week. The class curriculum emphasizes the use of adaptive techniques, aids and resources to improve or maintain independence. 
 
Orientation and mobility training is provided in the home or community according to the client’s need. This is one on one training specific to each client with the goal of safe travel and navigation within their own environment.

 

For clients who have a computer in their home and show experience or aptitude with computing, adaptive computer training classes are available. Classes include weekly lessons in adaptive computer programs such as Zoom Text, which enlarges text or JAWS a speech feedback program.

 

The Lighthouse of Manasota believes that education is critical in learning how to adapt, adjust and live with vision loss. Education helps both clients and their families understand what vision loss means and how education can bring them back to a lifestyle of independence.

Budget $589,600
Category Human Services, General/Other Services for Specific Populations
Program linked to organizational strategy? Yes
Population Served Other Health/Disability Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens Elderly and/or Disabled
Short Term Success

92% of clients will demonstrate through post functional assessment that, as a result of the class or training, client has improved his/her functioning in independent living skills. The measurement tool will be pre and post tests, objective assessment and participant records. The number of individuals who experienced functional gains or maintained their ability to engage in their customary daily life activities as a result of services was 94% last year.

 

85% of clients will incorporate at least one specific adaptive skill after completing the Independent Living Class or training. After class or training, clients will confirm through an exit survey or a follow up telephone survey that he/she has incorporated at least one specific skill learned in class into their daily life. 95% of clients reported use of at least one adaptive skill last year.
Long Term Success

Participation in educational programs will allow people to live independently despite vision loss.

When people have feelings of greater control and are more confident in their abilities, they are less likely to move directly to nursing home facilities upon losing their vision. Providing techniques and education and incorporating use of adaptive aids allows individuals who are blind or low vision to maintain their independence at home.

How Program is Monitored Measurement and evaluation of this Program occurs monthly so that The Lighthouse may assess client needs accordingly. This program has met its annual service delivery goals and achieved full compliance in all service delivery categories according to the contract held with the Division of Blind Services. We carefully monitor deliverables for each contract to ensure compliance goals quarterly
Program monitoring includes the following: Case notes and observation forms, pre and post tests, objective assessments, participant records and satisfaction surveys.
Also the Independent Living Program submits quarterly outcome reports based upon satisfaction surveys and pre/post testing to Manatee County government.
Examples of Program Success

The focus of training in the ILAP program is to maintain or increase levels of independence with daily living skills and to help clients adjust to vision loss by fostering self-esteem and self-advocacy. Training in adaptive techniques and low vision aids enables older blind clients to care for themselves in their own homes.

Recent examples:

A recently widowed gentleman who entered the program was depressed and just “hanging around waiting.” After participating in the independent living classes, he is smiling, making jokes in class, and is overcoming his despair, anger, and sadness. He has established friendships with his classmates and even made oven rack push-pullers for everyone in his class.
A 85-year-old gentleman who lives alone and has a limited income just over the state’s economic need guidelines was genuinely excited to be provided with a used CCTV provided by the Lighthouse. He is able to use the video magnifier to help with household management, reading, and writing. Other clients have been helped in a similar manner through the Lighthouse’s CCTV permanent loan program.

A local VA low vision optometrist expressed interest in a partnership with the Lighthouse upon noting the positive changes in a mutual client. She stated “his attitude has changed tremendously since starting this class and now he seems to be getting excited about life again.” 

A recent graduate of the program received a home follow-up visit from his instructor, who was thrilled to see that he had nurtured the plants from the sensory gardening class. He was using the herbs for cooking and was using the Foreman grill she had given him for ham, bacon, vegetables, burgers and more.  He told her how happy he was and how well he was adjusting to his new apartment after receiving indoor and outdoor O&M training, around the complex, getting to the pool and to several restaurants in the area and the new Publix grocery store."        
        

Description

The Lighthouse Vocational Rehabilitation Program provides services to individuals who are blind or with vision loss who are preparing for employment. The Program promotes personal independence and fosters action to achieve personal work goals. Training in the areas of assistive technology and orientation and mobility and personal management are emphasized for success in the workplace. This year, 48 people are expected to be served in the program.


All clients are referred to the Lighthouse by the Florida Division of Blind Services, who follow case progress through monthly reporting. To begin services, DBS requests that the Lighthouse provide specific vocational training that will strengthen the abilities and interests of the client. Lighthouse staff meet regularly with local DBS staff to discuss case plans and to monitor clients’ progress toward their employment goals. In this way, the client progresses to the expected level of competency.

The program carefully documents the progress made by each client. Activities are based upon individual case plans developed after work assessment. Training may occur at the Lighthouse or at the place of business.  Orientation to the workspace, including location and operation of work equipment, communication equipment (such as the telephone system) and travel mobility to and from the work site are commonly taught by Lighthouse Orientation and Mobility instructors. The following core categories are also stressed: Assessment, Assistive Technology Training, Counseling Services, Information & Referral.  Other training may include non-optical devices training (Optical and Contrast), personal management training, or community integration.

As in all Lighthouse programs, the staff who provide services to our clients hold special certification in the areas of Orientation & Mobility Instruction and Assistive Technology. Staff will provide training at a  Lighthouse of Manasota location or will travel to the workplace as needed.
Budget $143,800
Category Human Services, General/Other Services for Individuals with Disabilities
Program linked to organizational strategy? Yes
Population Served Other Health/Disability Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated
Short Term Success 55% of program participants will be considered successful at the close of their training, which means the client has achieved most or all of the skills provided by the services.
Long Term Success

The current unemployment rate among adults with visual impairments is high In the recent past, the range of social and employment opportunities available to the blind and visually impaired was limited.  As a result, individuals did not always aim to enter the workplace or take full advantage of community activities that enrich daily life. With the advent of the ADA, the United States looked for ways to integrate a generation of people with visual disabilities into the workforce and into community life.

Clients will see themselves as part of the workforce, expending their own time and energy to pursue career and employment goals.  Participation in the Vocational Rehabilitation Program will provide the tools necessary to remain motivated, to make efforts necessary to obtain employment and to take part in the modern workplace.

How Program is Monitored Meetings to discuss the progress of clients in the program are routinely held between Lighthouse staff and the Division of Bland Services, who authorize client placement in the Program.Measurement and evaluation of this Program occurs monthly so that The Lighthouse may assess client needs accordingly. This program has met its annual service delivery goals and achieved full compliance in all service delivery categories according to the contract held with the Division of Blind Services. We carefully monitor deliverables for each contract to ensure compliance goals quarterly
Program monitoring includes the following: Case notes and observation forms, pre and post tests, objective assessments, participant records and satisfaction surveys.
Examples of Program Success

Assistive Technology such as ZoomText and JAWS programs allow clients to enter into fields that require computer skills.  Client JG  would like to be a customer service representative. By working at the Lighthouse with her instructor, she has learned to use JAWS, which vocalizes all the menus and screens she will use at the workplace. She uses current Miscosoft products and is now able to send email messages in outlook and save Word documents to flash drives. Her workplace skills are improving. When her instructor suggested that her progress would improve if she had a more up-to-date computer in the home, a laptop was provided to her by DBS.

JB  is past his six month’s review as an employed insurance claims clerk.  JB took a variety of assistive technology classes at the Lighthouse, and adaptive equipment, ZoomText, was added at his work environment. Orientation and Mobility training were also part of his plan, and instructors worked on the local bus route and bus transfer station.

Description
This program provides early intervention services to children, birth through age five, with visual impairments and their families. Early intervention specialists review information from the child’s physician and visit the child and family in their homes.  Using information from this visit, the instructor creates a plan for learning experiences that will benefit the child developmentally. 
 
 The plan is directed toward concrete outcomes with clear measurements. Areas of the plan may include visual skills, compensatory skills and orientation and mobility skills.
Budget $141,200
Category Education, General/Other Special Education
Program linked to organizational strategy? Yes
Population Served Infants to Preschool (under age 5) Other Health/Disability
Short Term Success The Early Intervention Program exceeds all contract-related deliverables as set forth in its contract with the Division of Blind Services.
During the course of a year, 22 infants will be provided services in the early Intervention Program. Families are able to assist their child through all stages of development and to advocate for them. 
95% will report that instructors taught them how to use adaptive devices.
90% agree with the statement that the instructor taught them how to stimulate their child’s remaining vision.
90% would agree with the statement that the instructor helped the family deal with the school system, physicians, and others.
Long Term Success Participation in the Blind Babies Program may increase the likelihood of obtaining educational and social success as an adult. This is based on the presumption that early intervention in the life of a visually impaired child can result in social and neurological adaptations that help a child adapt to his/her disability. By teaching the parents to work with their infants, they encourage mental stimulation and physical coordination in children who might otherwise fall behind the developmental timeline of other infants.
How Program is Monitored Measurement and evaluation of this Program occurs monthly so that The Lighthouse may assess client needs accordingly. This program has met its annual service delivery goals and achieved full compliance in all service delivery categories according to the contract held with the Division of Blind Services. We carefully monitor deliverables for each contract to ensure compliance goals quarterly Program monitoring includes the following: Case notes and observation forms, pre and post tests, objective assessments, participant records and satisfaction surveys.
Tools used include the Functional Vision assessment (FVA), the Comprehensive Developmental Assessment (CDA) which is from the Oregon Project for Visually Impaired/Blind Preschoolers),teachers also use VIISA and INSITE as supplementary curricula.
Examples of Program Success This program was initiated in July 2011 with a goal of serving 22 babies by June 2012.  As of this date (January 2012) we have served 27 babies and expect to continue to exceed contractual goals.
Description
The Vocational Rehabilitation Transition program provides vocational rehabilitation transition services to blind and visually impaired students between the ages of 14 and 22.  The program promotes personal and economic independence, basing all activities on the client’s needs and by taking into account each student’s strengths preferences and weaknesses.  This year, 18 students will receive services in the program.

An initial needs assessment allows instructors to create educational experiences throughout the year that build competencies and strengthen skill sets that promote education and vocational awareness.  130 hours of programming is offered throughout the school year, punctuated by monthly weekend activities. Types of services include assistive technology training, Orientation and mobility training, case management, job development and job readiness.  Currently the program meets one weekday after school. 130 hours of additional intensive program activities are presented in the summer months. This includes a period of paid work experience for each student.  Job mentors from the local community create safe experiences to explore a variety of future career choices.
Budget $214,400
Category Employment, General/Other Vocational Rehabilitation
Program linked to organizational strategy? Yes
Population Served Other Health/Disability Adolescents Only (13-19 years) Other Named Groups
Short Term Success

• 75% of students will have obtained their post-school objectives. They will graduate or receive the certificate noted on their individualized plans.

• 100% of participants can identify and display job readiness skills such as proper business etiquette, timeliness and honesty in the workplace.

• All students will have resume preparation, interview training and time management training.

Long Term Success Students will see themselves as part of the future workforce, expending their own time and energy to pursue career and employment goals in their early adult life. Participation in the Transition Program will provide the tools necessary to remain motivated, to make the efforts necessary to obtain employment and to be in the modern work place.
In the recent past, the range of social and employment opportunities available to the blind and visually impaired was limited.  As a result, individuals did not always aim to enter the workplace or take full advantage of community activities that enrich daily life. With the advent of the ADA, the United States looked for ways to integrate a generation of people with visual disabilities into the workforce and into community life. The VRT program seeks to engage the current generation ages 14-22 and encourage vocational achievement.
How Program is Monitored
Program success is monitored by a review of client case files by managing staff as well as The Division of Blind Services; IEP review by local school instructors; Satisfaction surveys and functional evaluations. Measurement and evaluation of this Program occurs monthly so that The Lighthouse may assess client needs accordingly. This program has met its annual service delivery goals and achieved full compliance in all service delivery categories according to the contract held with the Division of Blind Services. We carefully monitor deliverables for each contract to ensure compliance goals quarterly

Program monitoring includes the following: Case notes and observation forms, pre and post tests, objective assessments, participant records and satisfaction surveys.

 

Examples of Program Success A student was able to call paratransit on the telephone and schedule a ride to the jobsite.
Students were able to make their own lunches and snacks.
A student was able to purchase a music cd in a store and then share that music with a peer group, solidifying friendships.
Students realized the cost of items and the importance of budgeting.
Students were able to negotiate with others and improve coping skills when things did not go their way.
Students experienced in a safe environment the results of not following directions and the subsequent consequences of their actions.
CEO/Executive Director
Executive Director Andy Reeves
CEO Term Start Dec 2014
Email andy.reeves@lighthouseofmanasota.org
Staff
Full Time Staff 16
Part Time Staff 16
Volunteers 26
Contractors 0
Staff Retention Rate % 94
Professional Development Yes
Management Reports to Board Yes
Organization Plans
Fundraising Plan Yes
Communication Plan No
Strategic Plan No
Strategic Plan Years 1
Strategic Plan Adopted Jan 2013
Management Succession Plan Yes
Policies and Procedures Yes
Continuity of Operations Plan Yes
Former CEOs
NameTerm
Ms. Janice Felski Sept 1998 - May 2012
Senior Staff
NameTitle
Lisa J. Howard CFREDirector of Development
Sally Meyers Program Director
Tina Smith Administrative Manager
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
NonManagement Formal Evaluation Yes
Collaborations
The following agencies and professionals in our community collaborate in the Independent Living Program:• Manatee County Sheriff’s Department: personal and home safety.• A Horticultural Therapist: Therapeutic container gardening.• A Certified Diabetes Educator: Self-care and management.• Low Vision Optometrists: Information on optical and non-optical devices and diseases of the eye.• Ringling Museum of Art: Docents lead an accessibility tour of select paintings using visual and tactile media.• The Art Center of Sarasota: Special programs and tours, including hands-on opportunities to experience art through touch.• Community Center for the Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing: Provides amplified big button phones at no cost to clients with dual hearing/visual impairment.• Sarasota and Manatee County Public Library: Establish and maintain low vision resources and host low vision and health fairs.• Sarasota and Manatee Voter Services: Training with accessible voting machines.• Senior residential facilities: Provide training on-site, establish low vision support groups, and presentations.• Various churches provide satellite locations for training.• Local chapters Florida Council of the Blind collaborate with Lighthouse on special events and advocacy efforts.
Affiliations
AffiliationYear
External Assessments and Accreditations
Assessment/AccreditationYear
National Accreditation Council for Agencies Serving the Blind and Visually Handicapped (NAC) - Accreditation2014
Awards
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Government Licenses
Is your organization licensed by the Government?
Policies
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistle Blower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy No
Board Chair
Board Chair Mr. Josh D. Kollman President
Company Affiliation Northern Trust
Board Term Jan 2012 to Dec 2015
Email jdk5@ntrs.com
Board Members
Board Members
NameAffiliation
Dr. Steven Bovio ODGulf Coast Eye Center
Linda Brown Retired Division of Blind Services Director
Dr. Scott Han ODEye Associates
Josh Kitchner K & P Benefits Consulting Group
Josh Kollman Norther Trust
Robert S Stroud Blalock Walters, Esq.
Student serving on the board through Community Youth Development? No
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 1
Caucasian 5
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 5
Female 1
Unspecified
Governance
Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Board Orientation Yes
Board Meeting Attendance % 91
Number of Full Board Meetings Annually 9
Board Self-Evaluation Yes
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage of Board Making Monetary Contributions 100
Percentage of Board Making In-Kind Contributions 100
Constituency Includes Client Representation No
Standing Committees
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Board Governance
Finance
Program / Program Planning
Financial Info
Fiscal Year 2014
Projected Revenue $1,418,500.00
Projected Expenses $1,418,500.00
Endowment Value $3,299,526.00
Spending Policy Income Only
Historical Financials
Revenue SourcesHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201420132012
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$0$0$0
Government Contributions$886,888$883,067$842,767
Federal$0$0$0
State$0$0$0
Local$0$0$0
Unspecified$886,888$883,067$842,767
Individual Contributions$240,725$580,126$213,066
$0$0$0
$0$0$0
Investment Income, Net of Losses$168,152$84,715$115,074
Membership Dues$0$0$0
Special Events$72,832$156,629$125,725
Revenue In-Kind$0$0$0
Other$726$0$725
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201420132012
Program Expense$1,202,325$1,119,256$1,104,167
Administration Expense$88,686$85,091$92,399
Fundraising Expense$35,668$33,645$36,690
Payments to Affiliates$0$0$0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.031.381.05
Program Expense/Total Expenses91%90%90%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue3%2%3%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201420132012
Total Assets$4,030,521$3,858,134$3,187,416
Current Assets$584,726$589,061$362,490
Long-Term Liabilities$0$0$0
Current Liabilities$123,886$113,591$88,259
Total Net Assets$3,906,635$3,744,543$3,099,157
Top Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201420132012
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountGovernment Grants - Unspecified $886,888Government Grants - Unspecified $883,067Government grants $842,767
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountContributions, gifts, grants $240,725Contributions, gifts, grants $580,126Contributions, gifts, grants $213,066
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountInvestment Income $168,152Fundraising $156,629Fundraising $125,725
CEO Compensation
Co-CEO Compensation
Tax Credits No
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201420132012
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities4.725.194.11
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201420132012
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Capital Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Financials Comments
Financial Comments by Organization
The Lighthouse began service to clients in Charlotte, DeSoto and Highlands counties at the request of the Division of Blind Services in late 2010. The cost of travel to these areas has grown significantly. To offset these costs, we have aggressively tried to manage these expenses through the implementation of a car rental program rather than mileage reimbursement which has reduced costs approximately 40%. Additionally, we are seeking grants that will pay for these additional transportation costs.
Financial Comments by Foundation
Financials provided based on IRS Form 990 and audit documents. 990s and audits reconcile.  Individual contributions include foundation and corporate support, as provided in 990s.
Nonprofit Lighthouse of Manasota
Address 7318 N Tamiami Trail
Sarasota, FL 342431401
Primary Phone 941 359-1404
CEO/Executive Director Andy Reeves
Board Chair Mr. Josh D. Kollman President
Board Chair Company Affiliation Northern Trust
Year of Incorporation 1985

THE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION OF SARASOTA COUNTY, INC. IS A REGISTERED 501(C)(3) NON-PROFIT CORPORATION. A COPY OF THE OFFICIAL REGISTRATION AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE DIVISION OF CONSUMER SERVICES BY CALLING TOLL-FREE WITHIN THE STATE (1-800-HELP-FLA) OR FROM THE WEBSITE: WWW.FRESHFROMFLORIDA.COM. REGISTRATION DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT, APPROVAL, OR RECOMMENDATION BY THE STATE. ONE HUNDRED PERCENT (100%) OF EACH CONTRIBUTION IS RECEIVED BY THE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION OF SARASOTA COUNTY. REGISTRATION #SC-02471.